Combating the Destruction of Ethiopia's Archaeological Heritage. (News & Notes)

By Desie, Asamerew; Cain, Chester et al. | Antiquity, December 2002 | Go to article overview

Combating the Destruction of Ethiopia's Archaeological Heritage. (News & Notes)


Desie, Asamerew, Cain, Chester, Finneran, Niall, Harlow, Michael, Phillips, Jacke, Antiquity


During November 2001, a joint American-British-Ethiopian archaeological team under the direction of Niall Finneran undertook a multi-period archaeological landscape survey of the region of Inda Selassie in the western administrative zone of Tigrai, northern Ethiopia (FIGURE 1, overleaf). Building on earlier work by the Ethiopian archaeologists Asamerew Desie and Tekle Hagos of the Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Addis Ababa, a range of sites dating from the early stone age into the late medieval period were located. These data form the basis of a sites and monuments register for the Shire region around Inda Selassie, and it is to be hoped that future collaborative work in the area will add considerably to our knowledge of Ethiopia's past.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

One of the key sites in this area is the tell site of May Adrasha. Large amounts of archaeological material have been noted eroding from this site over the last few years, but it has never been properly investigated. A cursory study of the ceramics by Jacke Phillips, and a more recent study by Chester Cain, have concluded that the lowest levels of this site may date from pre-Aksumite times, thus making it an early indicator of urbanism and socio-cultural complexity on the high Ethiopian plateau. During a visit to the site in December 2000, Michael Harlow noted that local peasants were digging holes in the site and removing the spoil to pan for gold (of a non-archaeological variety, see FIGURE 2).

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

In the intervening time, and especially over the long Summer Belg rains, this activity has unfortunately grown considerably, and the scale of destruction is potentially devastating. Now perhaps 40% of the site has been damaged by illicit digging (FIGURE 3); the spoil is removed and panned in the nearby river (FIGURE 4). Virtually all archaeological material is removed and dumped, and on the rare occasions natural gold is found it is usually sold on through two dealers in the town at a going rate of Birr 70 per gramme (about 6 [pounds sterling]). Occasionally some of the more obviously interesting archaeological material makes its way to the local culture bureau, where the usual practice is to offer a token reward for it being handed in. On the last day of our survey a large amount of pottery, glass, metal work, beads, coinage and human figurines arrived at the bureau where they were rapidly catalogued and photographed by the team (FIGURE 5).

[FIGURES 3-5 OMITTED]

This is an unsatisfactory situation; the site demands controlled archaeological excavation and high-grade protection. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Combating the Destruction of Ethiopia's Archaeological Heritage. (News & Notes)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.