Andrea Bowers. (Reviews: New York)

By Kantor, Jordan | Artforum International, January 2003 | Go to article overview

Andrea Bowers. (Reviews: New York)


Kantor, Jordan, Artforum International


SARA MELTZER GALLERY

Andrea Bowers's art wears its influences on its sleeve. References to Minimalist dance and sculpture abound in the Los Angeles-based artist's third New York solo exhibition: Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, and Simone Forti were all touchstones here, though Donald Judd seemed the true guiding spirit. Indeed, in a grid of source material Bowers framed as part of the show, a quotation by Judd looms large: "Form is a wobbly word to use because form and content is a false division derived from another false division, thought and feeling." Following this logic, Bowers has made the investigation of "false divisions" the subject of her art, though she updates Judd's terms for the contemporary situation. In previous works--specifically videos and drawings of crowds at sporting events--Bowers explored the divisions between individual and collective identity by focusing on the contingencies of difference. This exhibition continued her investigation of the society of spectacle by tackling the ever eroding boundary between the physical and the virtual.

An arcade game called Virtual Arena is the point of departure for Bowers's most recent project. In the game, the movements of (human) players are translated by a full-body motion sensor into a "virtual arena" where their digital alter egos fight against fictional characters. Bowers filmed individual players from the side, with the resulting videos showing them silhouetted against the sensor array's blue neon, kicking and punching unseen opponents. She then incorporated this footage into her sculpture. For example, in the exhibition's centerpiece, Box with Dance of Its Own Making, 2002 four monitors are set into Judd-like metal tubes that hang from the ceiling. Looking into the tubes to watch the players physically exert themselves in response to the ebb and flow of digital combat is at once humorous and haunting. On the one hand, the silhouettes look as if they were clumsily following the choreography of Rainer or Morris (Bowers's title explicitly nods to a similarly titled work by the latter); at the same ti me, their flailing offers a dystopic preview of our collective future physical isolation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Andrea Bowers. (Reviews: New York)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.