Trial by Fire: The International Criminal Court Pushes Ahead. (Global Notebook)

By Arnold, Anthony | Harvard International Review, Winter 2003 | Go to article overview

Trial by Fire: The International Criminal Court Pushes Ahead. (Global Notebook)


Arnold, Anthony, Harvard International Review


On September 3, 2002, the Assembly of States Parties, the governing body of the International Criminal Court (ICC), convened its inaugural meeting.

Although the ICC will not be completely operational until the second quarter of 2003, this initial gathering marked an achievement in the pursuit of international justice all the more remarkable in light of the harsh and unremitting opposition the Court has faced from the United States.

In May 2002, the Bush administration unceremoniously announced that the United States had withdrawn its signature from the treaty that would create the world's first permanent war crimes tribunal. Since that time, Washington has embarked on a campaign to undermine the Court's jurisdiction and frustrate its backers. The United States has raised several objections: that the Court would have the power to violate the sovereignty of countries that had not ratified the treaty; that its lack of accountability could result in politically motivated prosecutions of US officials; and that the Court could disregard or even undermine the power of the UN Security Council. These misgivings have been voiced repeatedly by an increasingly influential faction in the Bush administration that includes US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. Conservatives in Washington have used the attacks of September II and the war on terrorism to underscore US exceptionalism and to justify unilateralist policies.

Underlying this viewpoint is the fear that US military action and participation in peacekeeping efforts would be severely limited if it were bound by any standard of international law. This fear is hardly justified, considering that countries with high rates of participation in UN peacekeeping missions, such as the Scandanavian states and Bangladesh, are largely supportive of the ICC. Nevertheless, this remains the primary reason for the US rejection of the Court. US officials argue that any US citizen, even a civilian leader, operating in a country subject to the Court would be vulnerable to allegations of criminal acts and could be unduly prosecuted. The Bush administration says that this would make the United States reluctant to put its citizens in situations where they could be at risk. As a result, the US diplomatic corps has fought vigorously to exempt US citizens from the Court's jurisdiction.

In July 2002, after threatening to reject all peacekeeping operations by using its veto power in the UN Security Council, the United States secured a one-year grace period in which none of its citizens can be investigated or prosecuted by the Court. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trial by Fire: The International Criminal Court Pushes Ahead. (Global Notebook)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.