Secular Humanists Go to Washington. (the Humanist Activist)

By Grothe, D. J. | Free Inquiry, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Secular Humanists Go to Washington. (the Humanist Activist)


Grothe, D. J., Free Inquiry


November 2, 2002, saw history's largest gathering of politically active secular humanists in the United States' capital city. An estimated 2,400 secular humanists, freethinkers, atheists, agnostics, and other nonreligious citizens attended the "Godless Americans March on Washington," marching down the National Mall to a more than four-hour rally in front of the Capitol. Organized by American Atheists, the march featured speakers from many "godless" organizations, including the Council for Secular Humanism.

The Council, an early and enthusiastic supporter of the march, was well represented from the podium. Ed Buckner, executive director, gave a talk entitled "No More Lies," which got the audience to chant and cheer Buckner argued that America is not a Christian nation, and should not be. Norm Allen, director of African Americans for Humanism, also spoke. Allen's speech was titled "Black Nontheists: Coming Out." He talked about the trials and tribulations of Black freethinkers, and stated that Black secular humanists have always been heavily involved in Black humanism and intellectualism. Hr said that now is the time for Black nontheists to come out of the closet.

Other recent activities endorsed or sponsored by the Council for Secular Humanism and the Center for Inquiry include:

December 23, 2002: HumanLight Celebration. A celebration of humanist values: tolerance, compassion, empathy, honesty, free inquiry, reason, and rationality and more. The event was launched in New Jersey in 2001 by the New Jersey Humanist Network and is being held in several parts of the country this year. It provides an excellent alternative to Christmas celebrations. For more information, see www.secularhumanism.org'societies.htm or www.humanlight.org.

January 1, 2003: New Year Reality Revival. This event was partially inspired by another held in the '90s in California by the Atheists United group. Further ideas were generated through the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal's Young Skeptics Program, when science educators wanted to address the continuing need to encourage science literacy, Activities include reviews of "Annual Science Discoveries" and "Reality Revival Exhibitions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Secular Humanists Go to Washington. (the Humanist Activist)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.