Let the Net Lead You to Literary Travel Writing

By Wylie, Judy Babcock | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Let the Net Lead You to Literary Travel Writing


Wylie, Judy Babcock, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Judy Babcock Wylie Daily Herald Correspondent

There's nothing better on a cold and snowy night than snuggling in with a good travelogue. A great place to browse for good ones is a Web site created by University of Utah librarians, at www.lib.utah.edu/unreq/fb/3mp_travel.html.

You'll find books by unknowns such as Patrick Leigh Fermor, an 18-year-old who walked from Holland to Istanbul in 1933, as well as the complete works of well-known and cheerful travel writer Jan Morris and the major travel tomes by razor-sharp but not-so- cheerful Paul Theroux. You can look up an individual author or browse by region.

If your idea of a great travel book is Jack Kerouac's "On the Road," check out www.litelit.com/travels.html, which lists a passage from the book for almost every state in the union. This is more of a mental exercise than a travel site, but it's fun to browse.

I clicked on Ohio and found the following lyrical passage: "In the misty night we crossed Toledo and went onward across old Ohio. I realized I was beginning to cross and recross towns in America as though I were a traveling salesman - raggedy travelings, bad stock, rotten beans in the bottom of my bag of tricks, nobody buying."

Salon.com, www.salon.com, unfortunately no longer posts new travel material on its site, but its rich archives from its glory days during the dot.com euphoria are reason enough to check it out. Some of the liveliest travel writers - such as Elliott Hester, Rolf Potts, Jan Morris and others - posted their best travel features here in the last few years. The site also has worthwhile lists of the best literary travel books. …

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