Interiors: Pure and Simple

Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales), January 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Interiors: Pure and Simple


Byline: Gabrielle Fagan

WHEN it comes to interiors our individual tastes vary as much as they do over clothes - while some strive to be the last word in up-to-the-minute fashion trends, others prefer a more enduring and classic style.

Susan Trocme, is an advocate of the pure, sophisticated look that is classic, simple and never out of style - the interior design world's equivalent to 'the little black dress' - which she celebrates in her new book Classic Chic.

Throughout the beautifully illustrated style bible, Trocme emphasises the use of perfect materials, neutral colours and natural lines to create contemporary homes of enduring quality and elegance, whatever their size, location or character.

"A classic is something of established excellence, a standard work against which others are measured, or something quintessentially definitive or typical," she says.

Classic chic can take on many guises, depending on personal taste and the way we choose to live - but above all it should be liveable. "All rooms should be comfortable," says Trocme. "For some people physical comfort is the predominant aim of their chosen scheme. For others, control or order guides the presentation of an interior, producing a different type of psychological comfort. And for others still, it takes drama or the ultimate in elegance to fulfil their needs."

From streamlined, seamless rooms with slate-topped tables and free-standing furniture to spaces fused with Latin passion and the faded elegance of old wooden floors, Trocme demonstrates in her book that the essence of truly elegant interior design begins with certain key principles that guide aspects such as architectural form, lighting, colour, texture and shapes.

"Simplicity, suitability and proportion remain the three key elements to take into account when considering architecture and space. If a room works well it often looks good. …

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