Social Security, SSI Are Different Safety Nets

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

Social Security, SSI Are Different Safety Nets


Byline: Esther Hatfield District Manager, Elgin Social Security Office

People tend to confuse Social Security and Supplemental Security Income because both programs are run by the Social Security Administration and both provide benefits to aged, blind and disabled people.

However, the programs are different in important ways - financing, conditions of eligibility, payment amounts and basic purpose.

Social Security is a social insurance program you pay into when you are working so that you and your family can collect benefits when you can't work because of age, disability or death.

SSI is a public assistance program for people who are aged, disabled or blind with limited income and resources. SSI is paid for through general revenues, not Social Security taxes.

The two programs differ in other areas, such as conditions for eligibility and the method of figuring monthly payments.

Social Security benefits are payable in the event of retirement, disability or death. Wage earners need credit for a certain amount of work under Social Security to receive benefits.

Your benefit amount is based on your earnings averaged over your career. Eligible family members can receive benefits on your record.

To qualify for SSI, people must be age 65 or older or be blind or disabled and have limited income and resources.

Both children and adults can qualify on the basis of disability or blindness.

In deciding whether you meet the financial limits, we exclude part of your income, as well as the value of your house and one car and some other items.

Currently, nearly 250,000 persons in Illinois receive monthly SSI payments. They include 32,535 people 65 and older, and 216,242 who are disabled or blind (under age 65).

For information about the eligibility requirements for Social Security and SSI, type www.ssa.gov to access the following booklets, "Understanding the Benefits" and "Supplemental Security Income" on our Web site.

You also can call toll free at (800) 772-1213 to request copies of these publications, or visit your local Social Security office.

Did you know?

- Today's 65-year-old workers earn an extra 6. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Social Security, SSI Are Different Safety Nets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.