Noonan's Prediction

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 21, 2003 | Go to article overview

Noonan's Prediction


Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Noonan's prediction

"Why haven't our courts and lawmakers made greater progress in protecting the unborn when polls suggest public support is there?" Peggy Noonan asks at www.OpinionJournal.com.

"Lots of reasons, but one that I think is not sufficiently appreciated is this: Abortion is now the glue that holds the Democratic Party together. Without abortion to keep them together, the Democrats would fly apart into 50 small parties - Dems for free trade, Dems for protectionism; for quotas, for merit. All parties have divisions, the Republicans famously so, but Republicans have general philosophical views that keep them together and supported by groups that share their views. They're all united by, say, hostility to high taxes, but sometimes they have different reasons for opposing tax increases," Mrs. Noonan said.

"The Democratic Party, in contrast, has exhausted its great reasons for being, having achieved so many of them during the past 75 years. The Democrats often seem like the Not Republican Party, no more and no less. It is composed not of allied groups in pursuit of the same general principles, but warring groups vying for money, power, a louder voice, the elevation of their particular cause.

"The one thing they agree on, that holds them together and finances their elections, is abortion. ...

"No party can long endure, or could possibly flourish, with the unfettered killing of young humans as the thing that holds it together. And so a prediction on this grim anniversary [of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision]: Someday years from now, we will see abortion's final victim, and it will turn out to be the once-great Democratic Party, which was left at the end deformed, bloody and desperately trying to kick away from death, but unable to save itself."

Media whitewash

"Though Saturday's anti-war with Iraq 'peace' march in Washington, D.C., was organized by a far-left group, had a bunch of zany leftist outfits as sponsors, featured some far-out rhetoric from the stage which belied the notion that the organizers simply want a peaceful solution, and ended with a march to the Washington Navy Yard to demand access to U.S. 'weapons of mass destruction,' as if the U.S. and Iraqi possession of them is equivalent, major media outlets, both print and broadcast, ignored such realities which might have reduced empathy for the cause," the Media Research Center reports.

"Instead, the networks painted participants as sympathetically as possible, trying to make them identifiable to viewers as people next door, stressing how they were made up of 'grandparents,' 'honor students,' 'teachers,' 'businessmen,' 'military veterans,' 'soccer moms' and 'Republicans.' Plus, CNN really turned on the syrup by focusing on an elderly [Holocaust] survivor who caught 'a ride with a busload of young people, all to stop another war, to stop more suffering,'" Brent Baker writes at www.mediaresearch.org.

Meanwhile, the New York Times and The Washington Post apparently were too embarrassed to report what was said from the stage.

"A 1,500-word article in Sunday's Washington Post contained a single nine-word quote from an official speaker, while a 1,000-word New York Times article failed to quote a syllable from the D.C. stage," Mr. Baker said.

Peace pretenders

"America's enemies within turned out in force on Saturday in Washington, D.C., and San Francisco under the auspices of the Communist Workers World Party operating under its front organization, ANSWER," David Horowitz writes at www.FrontPageMagazine.com.

"Once again the demonstrators pretended to be peace activists, who found violence abhorrent and a willing media played along with the charade. Neither the New York Times nor the Los Angeles Times, nor any media I saw, identified the organizers as Communists who have a long record of support for world terror and its leaders, including the Ayatollah Khomeini, Kim Jong Il, Slobodan Milosevic and Saddam Hussein," Mr. …

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