The Man, the Message; in Honor of Martin Luther King Jr., Test What You Remember

By Bull, Roger | The Florida Times Union, January 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Man, the Message; in Honor of Martin Luther King Jr., Test What You Remember


Bull, Roger, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Roger Bull, Times-Union staff writer

Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the day that Jacksonville and the nation sets aside to honor the man. King spent more than a decade in the national spotlight, leading the civil rights movement with his calls for non-violence. He died from an assassin's bullet in April 1968, but his legacy lives on.

Test your knowledge of King's life and work with this quiz.

Answers, C-4

1. At his birth, King's name was:

A. Martin Luther King Jr.

B. Michael Luther King.

C. Martin Lawrence King Jr.

D. Martin Luther King III.

2. The Atlanta neighborhood in which King grew up was:

A. Brentwood.

B. Springfield.

C. Buckhead.

D. Auburn.

3. King's grandfather was pastor of what church?

A. Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

B. Greater Atlanta AME Church.

C. Macedonia Baptist Church.

D. Ebenezer Baptist Church.

4. King graduated from high school and entered college at what age?

A. 15.

B. 16.

C. 17.

D. 18.

5. After graduating from Morehouse College, King received his Ph.D. from:

A. Harvard University.

B. Columbia University.

C. Boston University.

D. University of Maryland.

6. After receiving his Ph.D., he became pastor in what city:

A. Atlanta.

B. Montgomery, Ala.

C. Selma, Ala.

D. Birmingham, Ala.

7. In 1957, he helped found and was president of what civil rights organization:

A. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

B. Congress of Racial Equality.

C. Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

D. Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

8. King modeled his philosophy of non-violence after:

A. Mohandas Gandhi.

B. Martin Luther.

C. Frederick Douglass.

D. Mohammed.

9. What was the purpose of the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott that King led?

A. To lower bus fares.

B. Better pay for bus drivers.

C. Stop the segregated seating policy on buses.

D. Benches at bus stops.

10. The boycott followed the arrest of:

A. Rosa Parks.

B. James Meredith.

C. Stokely Carmichael.

D. Angela Davis.

11. King's first book was published in 1958. The title was:

A. I Have a Dream.

B. Stride Toward Freedom.

C. From the Mountaintop.

D. The March to Selma.

12. While signing books at a Harlem department store in 1958, what happened to King?

A. He met Malcolm X for the first time.

B. He was hospitalized with appendicitis.

C. He was arrested and jailed.

D. He was stabbed by a woman later declared insane.

13. Which of the following did NOT happen to King in 1964?

A. Received the Nobel Peace Prize.

B. Witnessed the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

C. Addressed the United Nations.

D. Named Time magazine's Man of the Year.

14. King was arrested and jailed in St. Augustine in 1964 for:

A. Protesting a white-only beach.

B. Swimming in a motel pool.

C. Speeding.

D. Demanding service at a white-only restaurant. …

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