The Parable of the Farmer's Problems

Manila Bulletin, January 21, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Parable of the Farmer's Problems


THE farmer did not have very much by way of material possessions. His income could barely meet their basic needs as a family with six growing children.

Their nipa hut was crumbling and called desperately for much postponed repairs. When the rains were strong, several parts of the palmthatched roofing leaked to the annoyance of the wife and children. The sawali (woven bamboo strips) walls had gaping holes temporarily covered with discarded cardboards. Several pieces of bamboos on the floor had cracked and awaited replacement.

The family never missed a meal but their food consisted mostly of rice and vegetables gathered from their backyard.

But the farmer had one big joy and pride. His oldest daughter at eighteen years old was easily the prettiest in the whole barrio. During the last fiesta, she was the unanimous and uncontested choice as queen of the festivities in honor of their patron saint.

She was the most desirable girl as far as all the young men in the village and adjoining barrios were concerned. Many suitors came calling. Understandably, the father was overly protective and choosy in terms of the prospective son-in-law.

Finally, he set specific requirements. I have three problems. Any young man who can successfully solve my situation can have my blessings to marry my daughter.

What are your problems? …

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