Letters


AD NAUSEAM--THE `DIME BAG' AD

Lakewood, Calif.

* It was outrageous and disappointing to see the ad from the Office of National Drug Control Policy in The Nation equating buying and using marijuana (or any drugs) with supporting terrorism [Dec. 30; this issue]. That you would accept such a patently misleading, unbalanced and overly simplistic ad, an ad that attempts to draw a connection between drug use and terrorism, is astonishing, especially because it is contrary to the editorial content and theme of your magazine. Shame on you. Donald R. Hodel

Anchorage, Aka.

* I know you like to stir things up a bit, but including an ad from the Office of National Drug Control Policy made me question if I had the right magazine in my hands. You should have added a disclaimer or the motto, "Think globally, smoke domestic." Susan Bright

Los Angeles

* What's next? A Vatican-sponsored appeal to teenagers to "just say no" to sex?

Chris Kirshbaum

Bethesda, Md.

* Does the Office of National Drug Control Policy seriously think that someone dumb enough to be influenced by their ad would be reading The Nation? The kids at my high school who smoke occasionally read Jane, the complete potheads read High Times and the idiots (at whom the ad is obviously aimed, even though they're surprisingly drug-free) read National Review. Sandra Schachat

Madison, Wisc.

* As someone who "buys a dime bag occasionally" I want to thank the antidrug.com folks for explaining the pot = terrorism connection. I didn't realize until I read this ad how black-and-white and simple the whole thing is.

But I thought, "Why not find out who these terrorists, whom I supported for so long, are?" So I called my drug dealer and invited her out for coffee, to confront her. She told me she sells "dime bags" to help pay for college and support her 8-year-old. But wait, there's more ...

She doesn't grow the stuff herself. As she talked I saw how deep the rabbit hole goes. She then drove me to her ex-boyfriend's house. He grows the stuff; he's the source, the head terrorist operative. He showed me the plants. Almost twelve--"Enough to fund Al Qaeda for decades!" I thought. He said he's using the "dime bag" money to pay for his PhD in cultural anthropology. My God! Margaret Mead ... pot smoking ... communism ... terrorism ... My head was spinning. I got out of that place fast.

So thank you. I now understand "that drug money contributes to terrible things." I have picked which side I'm on. Now I challenge all Nation readers who smoke "dime bags" to do as I have done--turn over a new leaf.

Charles Monroe-Kane

Durham, NC

* I really don't care where your ad money comes from so long as The Nation continues to provide me with accurate, provocative information and opinion. But I would like to rebut the ad's message that if you buy illicit drugs, you're supporting terrorism. If you buy gasoline you're supporting terrorism. And on a far, far vaster scale. John Browner

Seattle

* A slight rewording of "that ad": Is it OK to support terrorism if it's only a little bit? So you pay taxes occasionally. It's not like you're paying millions to finance a misguided national drug policy and all the death and destruction it creates. And you understand the argument: that tax money contributes to terrible things. That if you pay taxes, your money goes to people who are responsible for murder, bribery, intimidation and torture. That if you stopped paying taxes, the government would go away, the violence would end. You get all that. But it's just a few tax dollars, right? Well, here's a secret: You don't pick which side you're on by how many taxes you pay. You pick which side you're on by paying in the first place. Matthew Landkammer

Lancaster, Pa.

* You may find of interest a message I sent to the private leadership list of drug-policy-reform and harm-reduction organizations:

"Fellow Reformers: I was also surprised to see the . …

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