A Note on the Effect of Faculty Information Resources on Instructional Materials and Research: A Correlation Study

By Wibowo, Kustim; Albohali, Mohamed et al. | International Journal of Instructional Media, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

A Note on the Effect of Faculty Information Resources on Instructional Materials and Research: A Correlation Study


Wibowo, Kustim, Albohali, Mohamed, Solak, James, International Journal of Instructional Media


I. INTRODUCTION

On some college campuses, the library has become an integral part of the university instructional process and classroom delivery by offering Introduction to Information courses. While this may be an objective worthy of the librarian's advocacy and involvement, Donnelly [1] revealed that a delicate balance exists between the rewards and the costs of becoming a teaching library. It also appears that many graduate students specializing in business and technical communication are gaining knowledge of research methods through course work (Campbell [2]).

In the area of psychology, a study by Landrum [3] examined that psychometric qualities help the effectiveness to assess the bibliographic instruction. Another survey conducted at the University of Wyoming in 1995 by Amstut and Whitson [4] concluded that librarians need to focus more attention on informing faculty about new holdings (both print and electronic), and informing faculty about ways in which faculty can enhance the research process through information technology. The survey also concluded that faculty need to recognize their own need for professional development relative to the library's resources and processes.

The source of information has changed dramatically. Today, faculty can obtain information for both research and course preparation from a variety of sources including the library. For course preparation, faculty rely on getting their information from textbooks, references, notes, and other academic materials such as, but not limited to, tutorials, videos, and software on magnetic media or other forms of storage devices that are usually available in their offices or departmental libraries. Depending on other factors such as the course level, course disciplines and the location and methodology of course delivery, offices or departmental resource rooms may not be sufficient enough in satisfying the faculty's instructional need and in providing an effective environment to student learning. Groomer and Murthy [5] stated that in the area of accounting, faculty were dissatisfied with the information from the set of available textbooks, but were satisfied with the computer resources available for teaching accounting courses.

Research activities, however, may have no relationship to the faculty's educational background or his/her classroom instructional materials. Factors that could deviate the research area from the classroom instructional materials are: (1) the faculty's own determination and desire to pursue research in the area of his/her interest; (2) colleague's interest; (3) department, college and university-at-large interest; (4) the business; and (5) other general interests such as funding availability. In this paper, factors such as the availability, type, and amount of information along with the process of getting the information will be investigated.

In Sections II and III, the research hypotheses and survey methodology are presented. Analysis methodology and results are provided in Section IV. Further discussion is presented in Section V, and conclusion remarks are provided in Section VI.

II. RESEARCH HYPOTHESES

Questions that were examined in this paper involve the correlation level and the degree of association or independence between various variables. Specific hypotheses such as:

i) Ho: The use of library materials to satisfy the faculty information need for course and the use of library materials to satisfy the faculty information need for research are independent of one another.

vs

Ha: The use of library materials to satisfy the faculty information need for course and the use of library materials to satisfy the faculty information need for research are dependent on one another.

ii) Ho: There is no significant correlation between the faculty's length of service and the faculty's computer proficiency. …

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