Space Missions Must Continue, Visitors Agree; Challenger Memorial Numbers Up

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2003 | Go to article overview

Space Missions Must Continue, Visitors Agree; Challenger Memorial Numbers Up


Byline: S.A. Miller, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Visitors to Arlington National Cemetery and the National Air and Space Museum yesterday mourned the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia but said manned missions to space must continue or else the seven astronauts will have died in vain.

In Arlington, Debbie McCallum, a photographer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration since 1973, placed a red rose at the base of the monument built to honor the seven astronauts of Space Shuttle Challenger who died on Jan. 28, 1986, shortly after takeoff.

Miss McCallum said she was honoring all 17 NASA astronauts killed during space exploration, but was especially grieving the loss of the seven aboard Columbia.

"Those people stood for something really important," she said. "We have to remember them, and it is important that we carry on the mission and never forget how important they really were."

Miss McCallum said the walk through the cemetery left her awe-struck by the nation's commitment to conquering space. She also said the United States should stay committed.

She said she was struck by the feeling while trekking from the memorial for President Kennedy, who vowed an American would be the first on the moon, to the Challenger memorial, which commemorates astronauts who died at a time when space travel had become almost routine.

The number of visitors at the Challenger memorial was more than usual yesterday, said cemetery staffers.

The Columbia crew also was in the thoughts of Michael Marciniak, 31, a laboratory technician and Army National Guard lieutenant from Durham, N.C. He was visiting the Kennedy memorial with his family. His 2-year-old daughter, Michaela, straddled his shoulders.

"You cannot help but think about it, being at such an honorable place," Lt. Marciniak said. He also said the Columbia astronauts deserved the same respect paid to fallen soldiers.

"It is like any service," Lt. Marciniak said. "You raise your right hand and swear to serve the United States. Their deaths should not deter us from the mission and from exploring space. If anything, it should be a driving force to carry on."

At the Smithsonian museum, Dan Enniss, 38, a janitor from Cleveland, said the exhibits gave him a clearer understanding of the scientific advances for which the Columbia crew gave their lives.

He said that the nation must keep sending men and women into space.

"If we don't, it means everyone who has risked everything has died in vain," Mr. Enniss said as he and his two children - Jennifer, 13, and John, 11 - stood beside a replica of Sputnik 1.

With its launch Oct. 4, 1957, the Soviet Sputnik became the first artificial satellite and touched off the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Standing in the museum wing dedicated to the Apollo missions that landed the first men on the moon in 1969, Elaine Phipps, 44, an information technology consultant from Boise, Idaho, said that most people don't fully appreciate the value of the space program. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Space Missions Must Continue, Visitors Agree; Challenger Memorial Numbers Up
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.