The Cup That Cheers; the Tea Council's Celebrity Photo Exhibition My Cup of Tea, Set Up in Aid of Cancer Research, Opens at Budokan Today. Caroline Foulkes (Weak, Milk, No Sugar) Takes a Look at Britain's Best Loved Beverage

The Birmingham Post (England), February 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Cup That Cheers; the Tea Council's Celebrity Photo Exhibition My Cup of Tea, Set Up in Aid of Cancer Research, Opens at Budokan Today. Caroline Foulkes (Weak, Milk, No Sugar) Takes a Look at Britain's Best Loved Beverage


Byline: Caroline Foulkes

There are two kinds of people in this world. Those who mash, and those who don't.

Now don't worry, mashing isn't something rude, or dodgy, or anything to do with drugs.

Some of you will have mashed without knowing it because, if you've never heard the word before, it will mean nothing to you. It's a word they use 'over there', on the other side - the east Midlands. It means brewing up, making the tea.

And while there are those who love to mash, there are those who can't think of anything worse. For them, tea is truly the devil's brew. Their caffeinated beverage of choice is coffee.

Our high streets may be packed with coffee shops, but England is resolutely loyal to the leaf. 'We drink around 165 million cups of tea a day in this country,' says Bill Gorman, executive director of the Tea Council.

'Tea is like breathing to the British. Just as we forget about the fact that we're breathing, we forget that we're drinking tea. It's like an automatic reaction, an habitual comfort.'

We've been mashing tea for some 350 years. The delights of the daily cuppa were introduced to us in the 1700s, when England first entered the tea trade through the East India Company.

We've been addicted ever since - something that provoked the ire of 19th-century political agitator William Cobbett when he found out the average labourer spent almost a third of his earnings on tea.

He denounced the beverage as a wicked waste of time and money, writing in Cottage Economy in 1822 that 'tea drinking has done a great deal in bringing this nation into the state of misery in which it now is. It must be evident to everyone that the practice of tea drinking must render the frame feeble, and unfit to encounter hard labour or severe weather'.

But, despite its pricey nature back then, tea actually saved Britain from becoming a nation of alcoholics.

'In the 17th and 18th centuries we had serious problems with alcoholism, so when tea was introduced it became a good alternative to cheap gin and beer, even though it was more expensive. Because of the quality of the water back then tea was also a more healthy drink, as boiling the water killed off the bugs,' says Bill.

In fact, our love of tea is legendary. Ask anyone in any other country to describe a typical English person and they are bound to mention tea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Cup That Cheers; the Tea Council's Celebrity Photo Exhibition My Cup of Tea, Set Up in Aid of Cancer Research, Opens at Budokan Today. Caroline Foulkes (Weak, Milk, No Sugar) Takes a Look at Britain's Best Loved Beverage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.