Bill of Rights' Implausible Defenders: Don't Look to the ACLU and Its Left-Wing Allies to Defend Your Liberty and the Constitution against the Encroaching Police State. (on the Home Front)

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, January 27, 2003 | Go to article overview

Bill of Rights' Implausible Defenders: Don't Look to the ACLU and Its Left-Wing Allies to Defend Your Liberty and the Constitution against the Encroaching Police State. (on the Home Front)


Jasper, William F., The New American


An incredible deception is underway. Ultra-leftist groups with long histories of supporting totalitarianism are posing as the chief defenders of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights against the current onslaught of police-state legislation. The Establishment media, of course, are assisting these pro-Communist poseurs, led by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the National Lawyers Guild (NLG), and the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR).

One of the more high-profile efforts in this deception campaign involves getting city governments to pass resolutions registering opposition to the police-state dangers posed by the USA PATRIOT Act, the Homeland Security Act, and other legislation and executive orders ostensibly aimed at combating terrorism. Local Bill Of Rights Defense Committees (BORDC) led by the ACLU, NLG, and CCR cadres are sponsoring these resolutions.

"Nearly two dozen cities around the country have passed resolutions urging federal authorities to respect the civil rights of local citizens when fighting terrorism," the New York Times reported on December 23rd. "Efforts to pass similar measures are under way in more than 60 other places," the story continued. According to the report in the Times, most of the resolutions have passed in liberal bastions like Boulder, Cob.; Santa Fe, N.M.; Cambridge, Mass.; and California "people's republics" like Berkeley, Santa Cruz, and Oakland. But, it notes, "less ideological places have also acted, with more localities considering it, from big cities like Chicago and Tampa, Fla., to smaller ones like Fairbanks, Alaska, and Grants Pass, Ore."

Controlling the Opposition

The federal government's expanding police powers should certainly concern freedom-loving Americans, especially since the September 11th terrorist attacks. But the ACLU and its leftist cohorts are improbable champions to oppose this dangerous trend. They are, in fact, controlled opposition, whose goals are the opposite of their publicly professed purpose.

"The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is our nation's guardian of liberty," declares the ACLU Internet home page, "working daily in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to all people in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States." The organization's record, however, belies these claims. The ACLU is integrally interlocked with both the street-level revolutionaries ostensibly opposing the Homeland Security Act and the Establishment revolutionaries designing and promoting it. The most important tie-in illustrating the ACLU's dual-purpose role is its top-level connections to the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), the one-world power elite's principal operational front.

The ACLU has pointed to the Orwellian Big Brother potential of the Homeland Security Act (HSA) to boost recruitment and raise funds. Apparently this scam is working; the organization claims that its membership has jumped to an all-time high, and funds are pouring in. What the ACLU does not point out is the close relationship of its top players to the CFR architects who gave us the HSA. The HSA and the mammoth new Homeland Security Department created by the legislation originated with the CFR-spawned Hart-Rudman Commission. Known formally as the United States Commission on National Security/21st Century, the Hart-Rudman Commission was established in 1998 at the urging of President Clinton and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, both members of the CFR. The commission, co-chaired by former Senators Gary Hart (CFR) and Warren Rudman (CFR), proposed what Congress has essentially adopted and President Bush has signed.

The ACLU's leadership is well represented in the CFR's membership rolls and works closely with this Insider brain trust. ACLU president Nadine Strossen is a CFR member. So is ACLU Executive Director Anthony D. Romero, a homosexual activist attorney who previously was a top staff member at the Ford Foundation, the CER-directed revolutionary cash cow providing funding to the ACLU. …

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