Research, Race and Diversity: Remembering Dr. King. (Last Word)

By Williams, Henry N. | Black Issues in Higher Education, January 30, 2003 | Go to article overview

Research, Race and Diversity: Remembering Dr. King. (Last Word)


Williams, Henry N., Black Issues in Higher Education


As we celebrate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this month, one might ask: Does King's dream exist in the research community?

In fact, this question is more relevant today than at any other period since King's assassination. The reality is that research has never before been more critical to the quality of human life and the world in which we live. As research has expanded, the number and diversity of research scientists and technicians in the United States has increased significantly. Yet the paucity of African American scientists and engineers in university and industrial research laboratories is striking, and unfortunately, the numbers are not increasing at meaningful rates.

This is not because there is not a need for more scientists. The nation's current work force of scientific and technological specialists is unable to supply the pressing demand. There is a need for more researchers to strengthen national security, advance national and global economies, prevent and cure diseases, and create and improve technologies to address social and environmental problems. King's dream of inclusion of African Americans in all the nation's enterprises sadly has not materialized in the research community. This lack of progress has persisted despite the improvements in racial diversity and inclusion that have been achieved in some other segments of society.

The failure to erode the many barriers to greater inclusion of African Americans in pursuit of careers in science is negatively impacting the nation's ability to increase the scientific work force. These barriers represent new dimensions in the evolution of the civil rights movement. They are often invisible, covert, subtle and not so apparent as those faced by King. Nonetheless, they are just as, if not more, deleterious. Because of their invisibility they resist positive change and serve to effectively maintain the status quo. …

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