Spreading the Word Missionaries Travel the World to Translate Bible for Other Cultures

By Pohl, Laura Zahn | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 9, 2003 | Go to article overview

Spreading the Word Missionaries Travel the World to Translate Bible for Other Cultures


Pohl, Laura Zahn, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Laura Zahn Pohl Daily Herald Correspondent

Like many parents whose youngest child has graduated from high school, Chuck and Barb Micheals decided that they were ready for a change of scenery in the summer of 2000.

So the 18-year veterans with Wycliffe Bible Translators in West Chicago left the relatively primitive conditions of Papua New Guinea, where their four children finished high school, and returned to West Chicago.

Chuck Micheals continues to work for the organization.

"We'd lived in a community with few cars, where you could walk every where, and for many years, there was no electricity after 6:30 at night," he said. "But it was the best thing I've ever done in my life."

Micheals is an example of the many people Wycliffe employs to establish written languages and provide Bible translations in under-developed countries across the globe. Currently, more than 6,000 missionaries and support people are based in 50 countries worldwide.

"We're still not completely sure how many languages there are in the world," said Forrest Zander, a resident of Winfield and Wycliffe's assistant director of stewardship. "We undertake linguistic surveys to determine the information we need on the different dialects and whether they re-quire separate translations."

Papua New Guinea was also the home of Andy Minch, who is currently living in Wheaton for a year before he returns to New Guinea. He worked for 17 years translating a New Testament into the Amanab language for 4,000 native speakers.

"When you get done, it's like you've walked on the moon," he said. "The problem is, you worry how you can top that."

Minch is now working to recruit and mobilize new workers for Wycliffe while on furlough.

Wycliffe Bible Translators was founded in 1942 by William Cameron Townsend. A missionary to the Cakchiquel Indians of Guatemala, Townsend gained the vision for translation when a Cakchiquel man challenged him: "If your God is so great, why doesn't He speak in my language?"

Townsend felt that every man, woman and child should be able to read the Bible in his own language. Borrowing the name of the pre- Reformation hero John Wycliffe, who first translated the Bible into English, Townsend founded Wycliffe Bible Translators.

The organization is now de-voted to fund-raising and sup-port, along with the Summer Institute of Linguistics, its sister organization that works in foreign nations to discover new languages, create written symbols and dictionaries and provide New Testament translations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Spreading the Word Missionaries Travel the World to Translate Bible for Other Cultures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.