Technology Q&A

Journal of Accountancy, February 2003 | Go to article overview

Technology Q&A


Keep Excel column titles on top ... Put a comment into a spreadsheet formula ... Easily review Track Changes comments from many authors ... Save the formatting when Word text is moved ... How to get those accent marks into your correspondence ... Create electronic sticky notes in Outlook ... Display nonconsecutive dates in Outlook's calendar ... Get your computer to reveal its inner secrets ... Shortcuts

Key to Instructions

To help readers follow the instructions in this article, we use two different typefaces.

Boldface type identifies the names of icons, agendas, URLs and application commands.

Sans serif type indicates instructions and commands that users should type and file names.

Shortcuts

* 0ffice: To quickly remove a toolbar icon, hold down the Alt key as you click on the icon and then drag it off the toolbar.

* Outlook: To create a contact (name, address, phone) from an e-mail message, drag the message to the Contacts icon in the Outlook bar.

* Excel 2002: To insert a path and file name on the header or footer of a spreadsheet, click on View, Header and Footer, Custom Header (or Footer) and click on the icon that looks like a folder with a piece of paper falling out of it (see screenshot at right).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

EXCEL

Q. When I have a spreadsheet with many pages, I make sure all the column titles appear on the top of each page so pertinent data are easy to find. But then, after painstakingly setting up the formatting for the dries, I sometimes have to add more data and that messes up all those carefully placed titles. Do you have any ideas on how to keep the tides in their place?

A. Indeed, that is a problem practically every spreadsheet creator faces, and yes, there is a neat solution for it built into Excel.

To make titles print on each page, no matter how you alter the data or the formatting, select File, Page Setup. When the dialog opens, click on the Sheet tab, producing this screen:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Next, click on the icon at the right side of the entry box Rows to repeat at top:, bringing up this screen:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Click on the row where your titles appear and press Enter, which takes you back to Page Setup. Click on OK, and your dries now will print on all worksheet pages.

Q. I know I can add a comment to a cell by clicking on Comment under the Insert toolbar, but is there a way to embed a comment inside a formula? That way, I can explain to viewers what the formula represents without having all those little red triangles sprinkled throughout, making my spreadsheet look as if it has chickenpox.

A. Well, there is a way to add a comment inside a formula (and yes, it's hidden, except when you put your cursor over it), but there also is a way to get the "chickenpox" marks out of Comments. I'll tell you how to do both.

Answering your immediate question, insert some numbers in a spreadsheet and then, when you write the formula that adds them up (=SUM(D2:D4), attach the following to the end of the formula: +N("Comments without chickenpox"). So, for example, the complete formula might look this:

=SUM(D2:D4)+N("Comments without chickenpox").

Now, when you highlight the formula cell, the comment appears in the formula box under the toolbar.

You can achieve a similar result using the Comment function. To add a comment to a cell, click on Insert, Comment and type your comment into the balloon that appears. In Excel's default setting, when you move the cursor off the cell, a small red triangle appears in the upper right-hand corner of the cell (see screenshot at right).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

When your cursor passes over the comment-embedded cell, the full comment appears in the balloon (see screenshot at left).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

You can adjust the default setting so you can control how, or even whether, those red markers appear. …

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