The Texas Lone Stars; They Numbered 24 at the Last Count, and Their Robes, Sound and Performance Conflict with Everything You Would Expect from a Group Gracing the Charts. Chris Brown Meets Polyphonic Spree

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), January 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Texas Lone Stars; They Numbered 24 at the Last Count, and Their Robes, Sound and Performance Conflict with Everything You Would Expect from a Group Gracing the Charts. Chris Brown Meets Polyphonic Spree


Byline: Chris Brown

THEY originate from Texas and not only have a different look to anyone else, they have a totally unique philosophy.

Polyphonic Spree call their album tracks ``sections,'' wear white robes on stage and numbered 24 at the last count. They also look like they should have more in common with a Deep South cult crossed with a church choir rather than a pop band. Despite only releasing their first album last year in the UK and playing in the city once before, they have already gained the affections of many a slightly obsessive fan. They also struggle because of their numbers. They have to get bulk buy flight deals and share hotel rooms.

They are due to play Liverpool University on January 31 and have an album out now called ``The Beginning Stages of ..'' Singer Tim DeLaughter is the group's founding member. He took time out from recording at the band's Dallas studio to speak about the cult that now surrounds The Polyphonic Spree. ``We are recording the second album at the moment in the studio. We will be in here right up until we leave for the UK.

``It's all going well. I'm not sure when it is going to get a release over there yet though because we only brought the last one out in the UK. ``Writing the songs is a lot easier than you would imagine even though there are so many of us. I come up with an idea on the guitar or piano and then present it to the rest of the band. We then just improvise around it until the song is finished.''

One of the band's biggest selling points is the sheer amount of energy that they have on stage. They number so many that they have to cram themselves in and yet the band leap around and play with a huge passion. It is this energy that appears to be contagious for their fans, meaning that there are many who want to join the cult. …

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The Texas Lone Stars; They Numbered 24 at the Last Count, and Their Robes, Sound and Performance Conflict with Everything You Would Expect from a Group Gracing the Charts. Chris Brown Meets Polyphonic Spree
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