ABA's Issues Blueprint. (ABA Chairman's Position)

By Patterson, Aubrey B. | ABA Banking Journal, February 2003 | Go to article overview

ABA's Issues Blueprint. (ABA Chairman's Position)


Patterson, Aubrey B., ABA Banking Journal


HOW DOES ABA DECIDE WHICH issues to work on in Washington? Who makes the final decision? And how can a banker find out more?

Let's take those questions one at a time.

How does ABA decide which issues to work on in Washington? The ABA government-relations process is quite comprehensive. It incorporates the input of ABA's Government Relations and Community Bankers councils, constant feedback from the state bankers associations, intelligence gathered from Capitol Hill and the direct input of our many members.

Who makes the final decision? In the end, of course, someone has to say: "Here's what we're going to focus on." That job is the responsibility of the ABA Board of Directors.

How can a banker find out more? For starters, keep reading. We've included the complete list of top issues approved by the ABA Board of Directors in October. The list is a blueprint not just for ABA's work in Washington over the next 12 months, but a snapshot of what's most on the minds of bankers in 2003.

The issues:

* Protect the product and service authorities in Gramm-Leach-Bliley by supporting the Fed/Treasury proposal on real estate brokerage and property management.

* Promote comprehensive deposit insurance reform, without increased premiums.

* Oppose unfair credit union expansion efforts and support taxation of expansionist credit unions.

* Work with law enforcement authorities, the Administration and Congress to fight terrorism through anti-money laundering efforts and other methods; ensure that new regulations do not impose unnecessary costs or liabilities.

* Regarding privacy, preserve the trust of bank customers; promote ID-theft education; help banks implement new regulations; oppose onerous state and federal legislation.

* Support ethical corporate conduct and accurate accounting, while working to ensure that new federal rules do not impose unnecessary regulatory or competitive costs. …

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