Bilingual Information Literacy and Academic Readiness: Reading, Writing and Retention

By Laskin, Miriam | Academic Exchange Quarterly, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Bilingual Information Literacy and Academic Readiness: Reading, Writing and Retention


Laskin, Miriam, Academic Exchange Quarterly


Abstract

The common ground between academic and information literacies, which serves as a foundation for building skills needed by ESL/Spanish dominant students, is described. This article addresses innovations in the teaching-learning environment at Hostos Community College, City University of New York, through the development of an information literacy program designed to support the academic readiness skills required by a bilingual, urban student body. A collaborative initiative with the Counseling faculty was established to deliver a course integrated program reaching the majority of freshmen to teach students how to think critically, compare and contrast, and evaluate and analyze information resources.

Introduction

As the dawn of the Information Age becomes early morning, academic administrators, faculty, and librarians have begun the complex but imperative restructuring of the higher education teaching-learning environment in order for students to be successful in their studies and in their future careers. Many educators have studied, conferenced, networked and written about how to meet the challenge facing higher education institutions, of ever-increasing access to information afforded by digital technology and the Internet (Blakeslee, Owens & Dixon 2001; Breivik 2000; Bruce 1994; Leckie & Fullerton 1999; Rader 1996; Shapiro & Hughes 1996; Taylor & Stamatoplos 1999).

U.S. faculty and administrators have been both urged and supported by national educational organizations, library associations, regional accrediting agencies, state education departments and commissions, and independent organizations, to prepare students for life in this digital, information-laden world (ACRL 1998). In its most recent Standards, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education notes:

   Information Literacy is vital to all disciplines and to effective
   teaching and learning in any institution. Institutions of higher
   education need to provide students and instructors with the
   knowledge, skills, and tools to obtain information in many formats
   and media in order to identify, retrieve and apply relevant and
   valid knowledge and information resources to their study, teaching
   and research (MSCHE p.32).

In response to these Middle States mandates and to better serve our students, the Hostos Community College Library of the City University of New York (CUNY), developed and implemented an information literacy (IL) program in Spring 2001. In addition to fulfilling the Middles States goals, there were other practical and impelling reasons for the Library to create a strong information literacy program at this bilingual, urban community college. This article addresses innovations in the teaching-learning environment through the development of an information literacy program designed to support the academic literacy skills needed by a bilingual student body.

Hostos Community College, a Bilingual Institution

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Community College is the youngest and smallest of CUNY's six community colleges. In 1970, it opened in the South Bronx with a special mission, to provide "educational opportunities leading to socio-economic mobility for first and second generation Hispanics, African Americans, and other residents of New York City who have encountered significant barriers to higher education" (Hostos 2002).

Hostos is the only CUNY campus whose mission is specifically bilingual; it allows Spanish-dominant students to begin courses in their native language while developing English facility in an English as a Second Language Program. Of the 3,283 students enrolled at Hostos in 2001, 70% were Hispanic, 25% African American, and 64% of the student body were not born on the U.S. mainland. Further, 35% of the 2001 freshman class did not attend high school in New York State; many received their secondary education outside the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bilingual Information Literacy and Academic Readiness: Reading, Writing and Retention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.