48th Annual Meeting of the Council of the Renaissance Society of America

Renaissance Quarterly, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

48th Annual Meeting of the Council of the Renaissance Society of America


SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

FRIDAY, APRIL 12,2002

12:00-1:45 PM

BARCELONA-CACTUS ROOMS

CHAPARRAL SUITES HOTEL

Attendees:

Michael Allen

Christianne Andersson

Thomas L. Berger

Eckhard Bernstein

David Bevington

Robert Bjork

Daniel Bornstein

William R. Bowen

Patricia Fortini Brown

Lynne Dickson Bruckner

Liana Cheney

Konrad Risenbichier

Martin Elsky

Max Engammare

Philip Ford

Ernest Gilman

Kenneth Gouwens

Margaret R. Greer

Paul F. Grendler

James Hankins

Margaret Hannay

Craig Harline

John M. Headley

M. Lindsay Kaplan

Sean Keilen

William Kennedy

Lloyd Kermode

Arthur E Kinney

Eva Kushner

Dennis Looney

John Marino

David Marsh

Angelo Mazzacco

Massimo Miglio

Alexander Nagel

John O'Malley

Jessie Anne Owens

Deborah Parker

Jane E. Phillips

Anne Lake Prescott

Sheila J. Rabin

Wayne A. Rebhorn

David Rutherford

Winfried Schleiner

Elliott Simon

Jeffrey Chipps Smith

Larissa Taylor

Nicholas Terpstra

Martine van Elke

Raymond Waddington

Germaine Warkentin

Retha M. Warnicke

Merry Wiesner-Hanks

Ronald G. Witt

Carla Zecher

Georgianna Ziegler

The meeting was called to order by President Patricia Fortini Brown.

She asked for a moment of silence in memory of our departed members.

The new president, Ronald Witt, and new vice-president, Jessie Anne Owens, were inducted.

Officers reports:

Treasurer George Labalme, Jr. reported in absentia in a statement read by Patricia Fortini Brown that the Society is still in good financial condition in spite of the decline in the stock market.

Executive Director John Monfasani thanked Robert Bjork and Laura Slavin of the ACRMS for all their work in making the Scottsdale meeting a success.

He asked that the Council approve a raise in Institutional fees from $90 to $100. The Council did so.

He asked the Council to approve a multi-year renewal option for members. To combat the continuing problem of members not renewing until they have received multiple notices, he proposed that regular members and retirees be allowed to renew for 2-5 years at a reduction of $5 per year for each year paid beyond the first. So, a regular member taking the 5 year option would pay $60 plus 4 x $55, which equals a saving of $20 plus locking in the years for the next 5 years. For students he suggested making the maximum 3 years to avoid someone taking the student rate when they are about to get a Ph.D and job. This motion was carried.

Chair of Trustees Anne Lake Prescott reported that the Society's portfolio could not escape the effects of September 11th, but there was no reason to panic. The soundest course is to maintain our present investment posture.

Membership Chair Deborah Parker. After reporting a rise in membership at the November Executive Board Meeting, the March 2002 membership figures are disappointingly low. This is the third year in a row in which membership numbers are very low in the spring only to rise back to high levels by the fall. The figures reflect an annual phenomenon -- the transitional period between renewal notices and actual renewal. The numbers will always be in flux between the fall and spring board meetings. The office must send out multiple renewal reminders to get people to renew. So she strongly endorsed the new multi-year renewal option. She also requested those present to contact her if they can suggest names of people in other societies whom she might approach to exchange mailing lists. …

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