Awards & Prizes


The William Inge Theatre Festival, held in April in Independence, Kans., will this year fete playwright Romulus Linney, the 24th recipient of the festival's Distinguished Achievement in the American Theatre Award. "We hope this well-deserved honor helps, in a small way, to introduce more of the public to Linney's unique contributions to the American theatre," says festival director Peter Ellenstein.

The prestigious George Jean Nathan Award, which honors the best piece of dramatic criticism annually, went this year to Daniel Mendelsohn for his two articles "When Not in Greece," about Shepard Sobel's Iphigeneia at Aulis at New York's Pearl Theatre Company and Tadashi Suzuki's Oedipus Rex at the Japan Society, and "The Greek Way," about Charles L. Mee's Big Love at Brooklyn Academy of Music. Both articles appeared in the New York Review of Books. The award is administered by Cornell University's department of English and confers $10,000 from the estate of critic George Jean Nathan upon the winner.

Also in publishing news, Judy A. Juracek's Natural Surfaces: Visual Research for Artists, Architects, and Designers (published by Norton) snagged the 2003 Golden Pen Award, to be presented by the United States Institute for Theatre Technology on March 16 in Minneapolis. Juracek is a professional scenic artist with a long list of regional theatre, opera, ballet, Off-Broadway and film credits, and is the co-founder of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival.

Four costume designers will be celebrated by Theatre Development Fund late this month in honor of costume designer Irene Sharaff. Jose Varona will receive the TDF Irene Sharaff Lifetime Achievement Award for his long career designing opera and ballet. …

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