Modern Language Association Publication Prizes, 2003

Chasqui, November 2002 | Go to article overview

Modern Language Association Publication Prizes, 2003


Annual Prizes with Competitions in 2003

James Russell Lowell Prize Deadline: 1 March 2003. Definition: For an outstanding literary or linguistic study, a critical edition of an important work, or a critical biography. Open to studies dealing with literary theory, media, cultural history, of interdisciplinary topics. Eligibility: Books published in 2002; authors must be current members of the MLA. Copies required: Six.

MLA Prize for a First Book Deadline: 1 April 2003. Definition: Same as for James Russell Lowell Prize. Eligibility: Book must have been published in 2002 as the first book-length publication of a current member of the MLA. Copies required: Six.

MLA Prize for Independent Scholars Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For a scholarly book in the field of English of other modern languages and literatures. Eligibility,: Books published in 2002. Authors enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree of holding a tenured, tenureaccruing, or tenure-track position in postsecondary education at the time of publication ate eligible. Authors or publishers must request an application form from the MLA. Authors need not be members of the MLA. Copies required: Six. Return completed application with copies.

Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For an outstanding book published in English in the field of Latin American and Spanish literatures and cultures. Competing books should be broadly interpretive works that enhance understanding of the interrelations among literature, the other arts, and society. Eligibilitly: Books published in 2002; authors need not be members of the MLA. Copies required: Six.

Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For an outstanding scholarly work in comparative literary studies involving at least two literatures. Eligibility: Books published in 2002; authors must be members of the MLA. Copies required: Four.

Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French and Francophone Studies Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For an outstanding scholarly work in French or francophone linguistic or literary studies. Eligibility: Books published in 2002; authors must be members of the MLA. Copies requircd: Four.

Kenneth W. Mildenberger Prize Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For a work in the field of teaching foreign languages and literatures. Eligibility: Articles published in 2001 or 2002; authors need not be members of the MLA. Copies required: Four. Note: The Kenneth Mildenberger Prize competition alternates between books, in even-numbered years, and articles pnblished in refereed journals, in odd-numbered years..

Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For a research publication in the field of teaching English language, literature, rhetoric, and composition. Eligibility: Books published in 2002; authors need not be members of the MLA. Copies required: Four.

Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies Deadline: 1 August 2003. Definition: For ah outstanding manuscript dealing with any aspect of the languages and literatures of Italy. Eligibility: Manuscripts accepted for publication before award deadline; authors must be current members of the MLA. Copies required: Two, plus contact and biographical information.

William Sanders Scarborough Prize Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For an outstanding scholarly study of black American literature or culture. Eligibility: Books published in 2002,- authors need not be members of the MLA. Copies required: Four

MLA Prize in United States Latino and Latina and Chicana. and Chicano Literary Cultural Studies Deadline: 1 May 2003. Definition: For an outstanding scholarly study in any language of United States Latina and Latina and Chicana and Chicano literature of culture. …

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Modern Language Association Publication Prizes, 2003
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