Perspective: Give Women a Chance - throughout the World; on International Women's Day, C Says Recognition of the Importance of Female Roles in Society Is Still Long Overdue

The Birmingham Post (England), March 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

Perspective: Give Women a Chance - throughout the World; on International Women's Day, C Says Recognition of the Importance of Female Roles in Society Is Still Long Overdue


Byline: Paul Groves

Women can change the world - in the era of Spice Girl-inspired girl power, this is no great news flash. And yet it should be, because it's not just about hot pants and pop songs.

Around the world women can make a massive impact on the quality of their own lives and the lives of people around them.

In poor countries women hold the key to relieving hunger, improving health and changing attitudes that exacerbate suffering. All they need is the chance to use it - and the best chance a woman can get is through education.

Yet current figures show that there are 66 million girls out of school worldwide. In education, as in other areas, being born with female chromosomes reduces your life chances from the outset.

A basic education gives a woman the power to alter the world around her.

Simply being able to read, means a woman can understand the instructions on the back of a packet of seeds and plant the crop that will feed her family. She can read the label on a bottle of pills and administer the drugs that will save her child's life. She can know what it says on the box of condoms and use them to protect herself from infection and unwanted pregnancy.

But today, of the 860 million people in the world who can't read or write, two-thirds are women.

An education also means broader horizons and the chance to participate in building the future. Taught about how diseases are spread, women in poor countries can take part in grass roots prevention - an essential part of the global battle against devastating epidemics like Aids and tuberculosis.

Rebecca is 12. She has had the chance to go to school in Malawi and says: 'I'm not scared about getting Aids now because we are taught about HIV at school.'

Educated about their place in the world and the position of their country on the international stage, women can choose to get involved and truly become global citizens. Safia from Pakistan explains her outlook changed when she went to school: 'A new world was opening out for me and I was quite excited. Suddenly I did not feel so hopeless.'

At the UN millennium summit, world leaders promised to get as many girls as boys into school by 2005. Yet at the current rate of progress 67 countries will miss the target. This is despite continually emerging evidence of the direct benefits to be gained by women going to school.

Education is clearly a route to escape from poverty and suffering. A recent Oxfam report revealed that rural women in Zambia with no education are twice as likely to be living in extreme poverty as those who have benefited from between eight and 12 years of education. And in Niger, with the world's highest infant mortality rate, maternal primary education improves survival 60 per cent.

So what is stopping girls getting into school and benefiting from an education? Some of the problems are financial. Low levels of public spending often mean that poor people have to pay to send their children to school - and many can't.

When costs are lowered, the children flood in. In Uganda, when school fees were removed, enrolment rose by more than two million.

Attitudes and cultural stereotypes in developing countries often form a barrier to girls' education as well.

Taklitin Walet Ferati, who works to promote education in the Gao region of Northern Mali, explains one of the common impediments. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Perspective: Give Women a Chance - throughout the World; on International Women's Day, C Says Recognition of the Importance of Female Roles in Society Is Still Long Overdue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.