Unleash Your Team's True Leadership Potential. (Credit Column)

By Slocum, Loren | Business Credit, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Unleash Your Team's True Leadership Potential. (Credit Column)


Slocum, Loren, Business Credit


What has the strongest impact on your company's success? The economy? The market conditions? Current events? In reality, it's none of those things. Regardless of outside factors, your company will only be as successful as you allow your employees to be. The fact is that when you inhibit your employees' natural abilities, your company profits are sure to drop. However, when you encourage your employees' personal development, your revenues will soar.

Today's most successful companies didn't attain that status by accident. Rather, their visionary leaders had the ability to tap into their team's talents so that their employees could lead the company in the right direction. Unfortunately, many business owners are afraid to let their employees exhibit control. They don't trust their employees to make the right decisions, and they mistakenly believe that leading a company is a solitary venture. However, when you enable your employees to discover their strengths and then encourage them to use their natural capabilities most effectively, you breed a team of leaders who each contribute meaningfully to the company's ultimate success.

To get your company operating at its maximum potential, it's essential that you promote an essence of leadership at every departmental level. The following suggestions will guide you through this process.

Connect rather than correct

Look around your organization and you're sure to find that your employees are doing some amazing things. Whether they're securing new client relationships, creating new procedures that save both time and money or raising the bar for customer service, your employees are working hard to make a positive contribution to your company's bottom line. The question is, how often do you acknowledge your teammates for doing such tasks?

Very often, supervisors focus only on aspects where their employees need to improve. Instead of acknowledging all the things their employees do to attract more customers, save money and increase customer retention, they focus on the sales deficiency, the decline in profits and the customer attrition rare. While knowing the gaps is indeed important, focusing solely on the negative is not the way to encourage employee leadership.

To foster a team of leaders, create systems that acknowledge your team's accomplishments. This does not necessarily have to be a big celebratory event; even the smallest gesture makes a big impression on your team's morale and willingness to contribute. For example, you could post sales figures or new customer contracts on the department bulletin board, organize a company luncheon, or even offer a simple "good job" the next time you talk with your employees. When you connect with your team and get them excited about work and about what they can accomplish, they'll go above and beyond your expectations to demonstrate the kind of leadership initiative that makes a positive contribution to the organization's goals.

Create a goal rather than assign a task

Do you know at which activities each employee on your team excels? Most supervisors do not. Despite this lack of knowledge, though, the majority of managers continue to assign tasks to their employees without any regard to the person's ability or interest. While it's true that there are certain tasks and procedures each employee must perform for the company to be successful, it's equally important that your employees are taking on responsibilities that excite them and give them a sense of purpose. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Unleash Your Team's True Leadership Potential. (Credit Column)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.