New York, New York! (Conference Countdown)

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New York, New York! (Conference Countdown)


The SLA Annual Conference 2003 has much to offer--great educational programs, networking opportunities, exposure to new products and services in the exhibit hail. And it will take place in a setting that has something for everyone: New York City. When you're not attending sessions or strolling the exhibit hail, there's one thing you must do: EAT! Here's a list of some of New York's famous restaurants, and a bit of the history behind them.

Four Seasons

99 E. 52nd Street

No restaurant is a better symbol of New York than the Four Seasons--a modern classic that has been redefining American cuisine since 1959. Winner of Where magazine's Best Food in New York award, the Four Seasons recently seduced New York magazine with "adventurous new flavors and marvelous pairings."

Le Cirque

455 Madison Avenue

When Sirio Maccioni opened his restaurant in 1974, he sent out a modest little announcement. So many friends decided to drop in so he wouldn't be alone that the restaurant was filled to the rafters.

The secret of Le Cirque's success lies in its style and attention to detail. Le Cirque serves up classical French, Italian, American, and--under the influence of Cambodian-born chef Sottha Khunn-Asian food.

Rainbow Room

30 Rockefeller Plaza

When Rockefeller Center was completed in the 1930s, the crown jewel was the Rainbow Room on the 65th floor of Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, the tallest and most prominent building in the complex. The room was designed to symbolize New York nightlife in all its elegance.

In 1974, David Rockefeller oversaw a painstaking $25 million restoration and expansion of the Rainbow Room, which many architects and designers consider to be the "most perfect room in New York."

Sardi's

234 W. 44th Street

In the heart of New York's theater district, Sardi's has been the toast of Broadway since 1928. The restaurant serves traditional continental cuisine and features hundreds of caricatures of theater and movie stars as artwork in the dining rooms.

Tavern on the Green

1 W. 67th Street

Built in 1870, the Victorian Gothic structure now known as Tavern on the Green housed 200 South Down sheep, which grazed across the street in Central Park's Sheep Meadow. …

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New York, New York! (Conference Countdown)
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