Mailmusic: Liberty Takers; Concert Reviews

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), March 23, 2003 | Go to article overview

Mailmusic: Liberty Takers; Concert Reviews


LIBERTY X

Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, March 14

SOME say they're a bunch of manufactured brats who can't sing or dance - but that's enough about Hear'Say.

Nearly two years after their TV embarrassment at not winnning talent show Popstars, Liberty X must feel justice has been done.

While Myleene, Danny and Co. have been dropped by their record label, Liberty X have gone from flopstars to real popstars.

Introducing themselves one by one to the crowd, Tony, Kevin, Jessica, Michelle and Kelli were welcomed by the sort of ear- piercing shrill you're more likely to hear at a swimming gala than at a pop concert.

Playing everything from R&B and 80s electro funk to disco and cheesy pop, the group seemed unafraid to be a little bit sassy. They were wearing lots of racy S&M gear and dancing choreographed routines that would make even Christina Aguliera blush with embarrassment. The best get- up was the girls' red rave suits, reminiscent of the parachute-style trousers MC Hammer used to parade around in.

Kodak did a whirling trade, given the amount of camera flashes going off. And for those who say only heavy metal concerts are loud, think again - just try sitting all the way through a pop concert full of thousands of screaming bairns chanting L- I-B-E-R-T-Y-X down your lug-hole.

Songs like Doin' It ( possibly a future mobile phone advert soundtrack), the super chart- topper Just A Little and the Whitney Houston-esque Holding On For You were all given the thumbs- up by the sugar-fuelled kids in the audience.

The highlight of the evening came for one little girl called Kelly, when she was plucked from the audience and invited up on to the stage to sing along on one particularly slushy number, even if it did seem as though it had all been pre- arranged.

For the hour or so they appeared on stage, there seemed to be enough substance to suggest Liberty X's music is more likely to survive than anything that's come out of the reality pop phenomenon.

BARRY GORDON

Tracy's still a bit of a rebel rocker

TRACY CHAPMAN Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, March 17

MODEST Tracy hasn't enjoyed the same chart success of her 1998 self- titled album, when her talk of revolution moved the masses.

But Chapman's tour is a sell-out. The radical edge has softened to produce introspective ballads on current album Let It Rain, focusing on things that happen outwith our control, including her sadness at the war with Iraq.

Her voice is crystal-clear and laden with emotion. The lyrics are passionate, plaintive and delivered with real sincerity. You can't help but warm to her.

She even admits to her Scots audience that she has tried haggis, albeit the vegetarian variety, and seems ashamed about not liking it that much.

From the new album came the seductive In The Dark, gospel-driven Say Hallelujah and bluesy You're The One.

This contrasted with a trip through her back catalogue from Across The Lines to Behind The Wall.

Favourites Fast Car and Talkin' Bout A Revolution still sounded fresh. She's Got Her Ticket showcased excellent guitar work from Joe Gore. Telling Stories showed that she can rock with a heavier vibe.

A standout track was the beautiful The Promise, merged with Save A Place For Me.

Encores produced the Bob Marley classic, Get Up, Stand Up - dedicated to world peace - which got the crowd on their feet, and she left us with the gentle lament, I Am Yours, from the current album, ending poignantly with the words "... I am yours/If you are mine". AVRIL CADDEN

It all pointed to a stunning gig

STIFF LITTLE FINGERS, Barrowland, Glasgow, March 17

THE Fingers turned in a monumental performance on what has become an unmissable St Patrick's day bash.

The Barowland's famous sprung floor was tested to the limit from the opening bars of Tin Soldiers. …

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