The New Imperialism; "No One Can Terrorize a Whole Nation, Unless We Are All His Accomplices." -ED MURROW

Manila Bulletin, March 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

The New Imperialism; "No One Can Terrorize a Whole Nation, Unless We Are All His Accomplices." -ED MURROW


IN the post-1991 Gulf War, the elder President George Bush Sr. announced proudly that a New World Order had dawned that would usher in a decade of prosperity and full employment.

Unfortunately, despite the liberation and recapture of Kuwait from the Iraqis and the military humiliation of Saddam Hussein in 1991, the American voters did not believe the elder Bush, and elected instead the handsome and brilliant Bill Clinton in 1992 who ironically was the one who enjoyed an unprecedented decade of economic growth that also saw the favorable and timely demise of the Soviet Union and Marxist-Leninism.

Today, notwithstanding the ultimate and certain military victory of the American juggernaut against Iraq, the younger President George W. Bush has achieved the opposite of what American Presidents from Harry S. Truman to John Kennedy to Bill Clinton, respectively, had painstakingly built up, through the United Nations, a relatively peaceful, non-confrontational , structured, and democratic consensus.

Hence, with the unilateral and unprovoked invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush has fractured, undermined, and destabilized not only the existing world order according to the United Nations but also prevailing bilateral and multilateral relationships, such as, with the European Union, Russia, China, the entire Islamic world, whether Arab or non-Arab, Africa and East Asia.

That is, President Bush has inadvertently and unwittingly changed the world's geopolitical equation without any idea or master design as to how to put back, so to speak the toothpaste back into the tube, or the Genie back into the bottle, or how to handle the postwar rehabilitation and peace in the region.

That is, as Saddam Hussein and Kim Jong-Il of North Korea have demonstrated, the Bush-type of "terrorism" must also be resisted while the world's "soft republics" stand in awe, fear, trepidation and distrust of the United States that has emerged from being a reluctant policeman of the world to a despotic and arrogant empire.

Who will now trust George W. Bush who has arrogated upon himself the Divine Rights of Kings and right of trespass into any country that is perceived to be harboring or tolerating terrorist organizations, as defined by the United States, and perceived to be a threat not only to the nation concerned but also to American national security and interest?

Thus, US President George W. Bush may succeed in decapitating Saddam Hussein and hastening a regime change in Iraq but he has also succeeded in alienating the majority members of the United Nations and the Arab world and its sympathizers who will, undoubtedly, engage in generational-long vendetta and terroristic activities wherever there are American citizens, US investments and American embassies. …

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The New Imperialism; "No One Can Terrorize a Whole Nation, Unless We Are All His Accomplices." -ED MURROW
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