Protesters Everywhere Do Not Necessarily Represent the Whole Country; (Editor's Note: Americans Who Approve of the War: 70 Percent of 285 Million. RP Protesters Don't Represent the More Than 82 Million of Us.)

Manila Bulletin, March 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Protesters Everywhere Do Not Necessarily Represent the Whole Country; (Editor's Note: Americans Who Approve of the War: 70 Percent of 285 Million. RP Protesters Don't Represent the More Than 82 Million of Us.)


THE marchers and protesters on main avenues and in front of the US embassies all over the world shout their grievances and denounce the war for a number of reasons.

But dissenters should not be silenced by supporters of the war against Iraq, especially those officials around President Bush and Tony Blair.

This line from The New York Times editorial is worth noting: "It will be necessary to remind them that America is in this fight to bring freedom of speech to Iraq, not to smother it back home."

It's easy to note why their speeches and placards are redundant, "imperialism, fascism, exploiters, etc." referring to the US.

Americans support war

The AFP reports that The New York Times/CBS poll Saturday (March 22) shows "70 percent of Americans approved of Bush's handling of Iraq, an increase of 19 percent in 10 days. The percentage of those who disapproved of Bush's Iraqi policy dropped 15 points, to 27 percent during the same period." (MB, March 23, p. 2)

We see on world TV thousands in New York, Chicago and San Francisco, mostly young Americans, denouncing the war.

If we consider the fact that America has a population of 285 million, the protesters are just exercising a few rights in the US Constitution, the kind of document that Iraqis have sorely missed since July 1979 when General Saddam Hussein seized power.

Protesters in RP, in the same light, don't represent the Filipinos now numbering more than 82 million.

No protesters vs Japan

In the 1930s, the military faction in Imperial Japan started marching and shooting in China with one clear goal: Fascism must dominate China and Southeast Asia.

When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and Manila in December 1941 the US was not ready for war on two fronts, in the Pacific and Europe. Japan's military clique moved fast to take over most of China, Southeast Asia (including Filipinas), and New Guinea. Japan was preparing to start the Australian campaign by taking Darwin; they were on New Guinea in 1942.

(Listen to Nick Joaquin: "Vargas informed President Quezon that the Japanese had bombarded Clark Field and that the entire base was in flames. Puneta! Cried Quezon. 'What the hell are the American planes doing?' Neither he nor Vargas knew that the Japs had already wiped out the American air force in the Philippines.")

It took the US more than three years and two atomic bombs to reverse Fascism in the Pacific. …

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