Academic Excellence Must Include Physical Education. (the Physical Educator)

By Langford, George A.; Carter, LaGary | Physical Educator, Winter 2003 | Go to article overview

Academic Excellence Must Include Physical Education. (the Physical Educator)


Langford, George A., Carter, LaGary, Physical Educator


Abstract

Physical education has long been an integral part of the school curriculum. However, many times the instruction is very similar from one grade to the next in middle/junior and senior high school. Physical education curricula should be sequential to promote lifelong physical activity. The problem is that primary and secondary physical education often invokes spectator sports or group activities, yet few individuals ever have the opportunity or desire to engage in such pursuits throughout adulthood. Physical educators within the schools have failed to address the components of health-related fitness within physical education such as body composition, cardiorespiratory endurance and musculoskeletal fitness. Instead, the bulk of instruction tends to be geared towards developing the components of skill-related fitness such as speed, agility, and muscular power. The majority of our states require only one year of physical education or have no requirements in grades 9-12. The debate among politicians, school administrators, teachers and parents concerns the value of subject matter as it relates to improving national test scores. The educational philosophy today is to compromise or even eliminate physical development in the hope of improving one's cognition. It is plausible that a decline in all aspects of the educational paradigm will suffer from an unbalanced approach to improving the whole.

The requirement of physical education has long been an integral part of the school curriculum. However, many times the instruction is very similar from one grade to the next in middle/ junior and senior high school. The same skills that are taught in sixth grade softball are re-taught each year through the twelfth grade. For the most part, students never experience a difference in content from one year to the next. This certainly doesn't happen in other disciplines. In mathematics, we find that pre-algebra knowledge and skills lead to algebra then to geometry then to algebra II and then to trigonometry. Curricular guides in physical education must be developed to provide distinct scope and sequence from one grade to the next. Physical education curricula should be sequential to promote lifelong physical activity. These guides must remove the redundancy of twelve years of content and superfluous repetition of skill development for the mere sake of expertness.

This capricious attitude exemplified by physical education curriculums has led to a decrease in the physical education requirements in the public schools. Also, it has produced a generation of unmotivated, overweight, inactive, technological couch potatoes.

Facing the Facts

The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (1993) revealed in it's "Shape of the Nation" article, that after Congress passed Resolution 97 encouraging states and local school boards to provide quality physical education programs, six years later there are only thirteen states that require a physical education specialist to teach elementary school physical education. Also, more than half of the states requires only one year of physical education or have no requirements in grades 9-12. Less than 36% of elementary and secondary schools even offer daily physical education (Southern et al., 1999).

Data contained within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1996), Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, revealed that fourteen percent of the young people surveyed reported they had not been involved recently in physical activity. As age or grade increases, participation in physical activity sharply diminishes. Almost half of Americans age 12-21 are not participating in regular vigorous activity. During adolescence, physical activity distinctly decreases. Less than 20 percent of high school students are physically active, five days a week, for 20 minutes or longer, in physical education classes. Between 1991 and 1995, enrollment of high school students in daily physical education classes have dropped from 42 percent to 25 percent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Academic Excellence Must Include Physical Education. (the Physical Educator)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.