Why Terrorism Works

Manila Bulletin, March 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Why Terrorism Works


US President George W. Bush must have felt himself greatly empowered if he had read the insightful analysis of terrorism that Alan M. Dershowitz explains with clarity in his latest book titled, Why Terrorism Works: Understanding the threat, responding to the challenge. (Published 2002, R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co., Inc.) The author is professor of law at Harvard Law School, Americas most renowned criminal defense and civil liberties attorney, and dubbed by Time Magazine as the top lawyer of last resort in America.

Dershowitz affirms that the greatest danger facing the world today comes from statesponsored terrorist groups that are developing weapons of mass destruction for use against civilian targets. With indicting language, he argues passionately the global terrorism is largely of our own making. Based on the recent acts of terrorism and the corresponding reactions, he explains that terrorism is successful when we give in to the terrorists' demands. To defeat terrorism, he writes, we must "reduce the frequency and severity of terrorist attacks."

There are good reasons to believe Bush has read this powerful and provocative book. There, Dershowitz discusses the extreme approaches to wipe out international terrorism even if the constraints of legal, moral, and humanitarian considerations are compromised. Dershowitz proposes that under these relegated constraints, his extreme proposals would reduce the frequency and severity of terrorism by striking a balance between security and liberty, such as disarmament for world's security, and invasion of the sovereignty of a free state.

Dershowitz's proposal to combat terrorism combines macro and micro approaches. The most important macro step is never permit terrorists to benefit from their acts, especially if they have specific political goals. No matter how noble those goals, they must never be allowed to advance through terrorism. This will give terrorists the message that their cause has nothing to gain, but instead has something to lose from engaging in terrorism. But benefits may be built into the system to assure serious attention to their causes that forego terrorism.

The complementary micro step, proposed by Dershowitz with which to combat terrorism, entails promulgation of new government policies, such as tightening controls over the country's borders, requiring national ID cards, establishing military tribunals, infiltrating domestic groups, spreading electronic monitoring authority, resorting to more exchanges of information among prosecutorial and intelligence agencies, and imposing restrictions on freedom of speech, etc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Terrorism Works
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.