Recycling Radicalism: The Militants Running the "Anti-War" Demonstrations Are Following a Plan to Organize, Mobilize, Radicalize, Militarize, and Globalize. (Cover Story War & Peace)

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, March 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

Recycling Radicalism: The Militants Running the "Anti-War" Demonstrations Are Following a Plan to Organize, Mobilize, Radicalize, Militarize, and Globalize. (Cover Story War & Peace)


Jasper, William F., The New American


Is America on the brink of another violent epoch of 1960s-style upheaval and polarization? Will riots and violent street demonstrations erupt in your city? Will our country be torn by on-going strife and renewed bouts of terrorism? The dials are being preset, it appears, for precisely those outcomes. The growing mobilization of "peace" demonstrators and the steady radicalization of the movement is a dark portent of coming ill.

Following the same 1960s formula of "organize, mobilize, radicalize, and militarize," today's supposed anti-war leaders are preparing tens of thousands of new recruits to "man the barricades" and serve as cannon fodder in an escalating round of revolutionary violence. This should come as no surprise, since the key organizers of these events are veteran radicals of the Vietnam War era's turbulent demonstrations. As we will show, many of these individuals are actually hard-core Communists with long records of sedition, treason, terrorism, and aiding America's enemies.

The violence that erupted during the February 16th demonstrations in San Francisco foreshadows things to come. A reported 200,000 demonstrators came out to what was, for the most part, a peaceful rally, featuring lots of singing, tie-dyed sandalistas, and Kumbaya vibes. Actor/activist Danny Glover, serving as master of ceremonies, provided star power, along with singer and longtime radical activist Bonnie Raitt. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, about 1,000 of the demonstrators broke off from the main gathering to rampage through a shopping district, smashing windows, starting fires, spraying graffiti, taking over traffic intersections and cable cars, blocking the municipal rail, and combatting the police. Two police officers were reported injured and taken to San Francisco General Hospital. Forty-six rioters were reported arrested -- 28 men and 18 women.

This is not an isolated incident; the "peace" activists have been refining and escalating their violent organizing tactics since their wildly successful "Battle in Seattle" in December 1999. At that time, the masses of street demonstrators were purportedly opposing the sovereignty-destroying World Trade Organization (WTO). That wasn't the real reason at all, as subsequent events proved. After capturing world attention with violent riots, the demonstration organizers, including 1960s radical Ralph Nader and his lieutenant, Lori Wallach, called not for abolishing the WTO, but for expanding its powers.

Crushing Sovereignty

This apparent contradiction did not surprise us; neither did it surprise those in the know on the other side. Leftist one-worlder Robert Wright, a senior editor for The New Republic, wrote approvingly of this about-face in a cover story entitled, "America is surrendering its sovereignty to a world government. Hooray." The Left, you see, is not against globalization so long as it's based on the socialist model.

Wright notes in his article: "Much power now vested in the nation-state is indeed starting to migrate to international institutions, and one of these is the WTO." He saw this as a very good thing. He also appreciated that "Nader and most of the Seattle left would gladly accept a sovereignty-crushing world body if it followed the leftist model of supranational governance found in the European Union." "Indeed," said Wright, "it was partly to please the Seattle activists that President Clinton espoused a future WTO whose member nations would meet global environmental and labor standards or else face sanction."

Mr. Nader and his Citizen Works organization are now trying to pull the same kind of reversal with their phony opposition to the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), a regional government trap to be patterned after the European Union. They are also key players in the current anti-war demonstrations, along with many of their fellow anti-WTO, anti-FTAA cohorts. And they are once again using the demonstrations to push the world government bandwagon, this time through appeals to further empower the UN. …

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Recycling Radicalism: The Militants Running the "Anti-War" Demonstrations Are Following a Plan to Organize, Mobilize, Radicalize, Militarize, and Globalize. (Cover Story War & Peace)
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