Arabs Doubt That Two Wrongs Make One Right

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 21, 2003 | Go to article overview

Arabs Doubt That Two Wrongs Make One Right


Byline: Ray Hanania

The war against Iraq evokes mixed feelings for Arabs here and in the Middle East. As a former military veteran, I support our troops with a deep sense of patriotism, but I oppose the policies of President Bush that have unjustly put our troops in harm's way.

Most Arabs and even Palestinians recognize that Iraq's President Saddam Hussein is a tyrant and even the murderer that Bush asserts, but they do not believe that two wrongs make a right.

In the eyes of most Arabs and Palestinians, President Bush is a tyrant. They see him as a hypocrite who is willing to launch an unjustified war that could result in the deaths of as many innocent civilians as Bush claims Hussein is responsible for killing.

Justice is not "relative." You don't look at a conflict and say one nation is more right or more wrong than another. Right is right. Justice is justice. That explains why most Arabs and Palestinians oppose the American-led war against Iraq.

The Arab world sees the United States as the aggressor in an unjustified war not sanctioned by the very United Nations that Bush uses to justify the war.

None believes Bush launched his war of aggression to "liberate" Iraqis or Arabs, as the president claims. They know Bush is playing a game of selfish politics. The real motivations are to avenge his father's honor and to grab control of Iraq's resources and oil fields.

Bush says Hussein is a threat to America, yet Arabs and Palestinians remember Hussein as an American creation used and then discarded. They watch as Bush meekly reacts to threats of nuclear attack from North Korea while ignoring other threatening nations ruled by tyrants.

The president's claim that we must attack Iraq because Iraq has violated numerous U. …

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