No Chanters against Mao & Soviet Union

Manila Bulletin, March 28, 2003 | Go to article overview

No Chanters against Mao & Soviet Union


(Editors note: Activists and militants in the late 1950s and 1960s forgot to march for far greater causes.)

AFTER defeating the Kuomintang Army on the mainland, the new national leadership instituted reforms in the following manner: 1) editors and journalists were rounded up; 2) teachers and professors were likewise arrested; 3) people with high IQ and progressive ideas were picked up, and 4) even Confucian doctrines were suppressed.

"People's courts"

People's courts were set up to try and condemn landlords and "class enemies."

Historians and journalists would later on denounce the Communist government for one main reason: Most of the persons arrested or rounded up in categories 1, 2 and 3 were never heard from, leaving their families wailing in the dark.

Not a single Filipino activist/militant fabricated a placard/banner and denounced Mao Zedong, Zhou En-lai or the Communist regime and leaders.

Cultural revolution in China

In 1958, Mao introduced his Great Leap Forward to "insure" progress on all fronts without outside aid. The Great Leap was a catastrophic failure, causing widespread famine. Mao admitted failure in a forced self-criticism in 1960 and withdrew into the background.

Mao made a bid to return to full power in 1966 by launching the Cultural Revolution. His shock troops composed of teenage Red Guards were used to attack the entrenched bureaucracy.

Party pragmatists led by Liu Shaoqui and Deng Xiaoping were placed under house arrest or exiled to remote areas. Intellectuals, technical workers, and bureaucrats were severely persecuted.

Militants or students anywhere in the world had not collected a dozen marchers to denounce widespread persecution and the ever lengthening list of missing persons.

The fanatical Red Guards even sent their parents to cadre schools for indoctrination.

Crushing a revolt?

After Stalin's death in 1953, moderate leader Imre Nagy became premier of Hungary. He introduced economic reforms, but was forced out of office. This led to a popular uprising in October 1956. …

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