Activists Decry Anti-Terrorism Bill

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), March 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

Activists Decry Anti-Terrorism Bill


Byline: David Steves The Register-Guard

SALEM - Protesters made their way Monday from the streets of Eugene and Portland to the state Capitol, where more than 100 people gathered to speak out against anti-terrorism legislation.

Senate Bill 742 would create the crime of terrorism, loosen restrictions on police intelligence-gathering techniques and permit arrests of immigration-law violators.

Its first hearing drew a decidedly one-sided response as all of the 80 people who signed up to testify listed themselves as opponents.

After a few instances when loud murmurs and rounds of applause interrupted testimony, Senate Judiciary Chairman John Minnis, R-Wood Village, warned that he would order the room cleared if the outbursts continued. Even so, the audience bore little resemblance to the chanting, sign-waving crowds that have jammed downtowns of the two Oregon cities in recent weeks during the buildup and launch of the U.S.-led war in Iraq.

The Portland protests, in particular, involved actions such as breaking store windows, blocking traffic and clashing with police that could be construed as terrorism under SB 742.

And even the majority of participants who peacefully chanted, marched and waved signs could, by association, be in trouble under such a law.

Many of those who attended the hearing said their involvement in street demonstrations spurred them to speak out.

One was Jill Davidson of Eugene, who said she hasn't taken part in legislative politics before, but came to voice her fears of "a kind of McCarthyism" in the government's response to terrorism and anti-war protests.

She was among about 75 people who sat in folding chairs outside the Senate chambers, quietly watching a closed-circuit telecast of the testimony. The hearing room, one floor above, was filled to capacity.

Minnis, the bill's sponsor, said he was disappointed that so many speakers, including criminal defense and civil liberties attorneys, had used "hyperbole" to claim that his bill would allow arrests and possible life sentences for people who merely take part in a strike, rally or other demonstration that disrupts commerce, government institutions or transportation.

Although Minnis conceded that the original bill could be interpreted that way, he drafted amendments that would allow such prosecution only if people knew or "reasonably should know" that their activity could lead to death or serious injury.

Still, many of the activists who testified said they opposed the amended bill as a threat to their constitutionally protected right to demonstrate against laws, work conditions or other conditions they find objectionable. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Activists Decry Anti-Terrorism Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.