Britain

By Margaronis, Maria | The Nation, April 14, 2003 | Go to article overview

Britain


Margaronis, Maria, The Nation


London

The night the war began, an ashen-faced woman in Parliament Square held up a photograph of an Iraqi soldier, reduced to a smudge of carbon but for his head and feet--an image from the last Gulf War. "He's the same age as my son. I put a lot into bringing up my son." She'd come from Redbridge, a London suburb not known for its radicalism. "We're not political animals," the man with her confirmed. "But this comes from the heart. We're being patronized by Tony Blair--how can we follow George Bush? I just feel utterly disgusted."

Most people expected the protests in Britain to die down once the bombs started falling and the media switched into we're-backing-our-boys mode. It hasn't turned out that way. On the first day of the invasion, spontaneous protests sprang up across the country in response to the Stop the War Coalition's call for a walkout from work, school or college. In Leeds, protesters closed the main motorway; in Manchester several thousand young people shut down the city center. Civil servants left government offices, including the deputy prime minister's. Thousands of schoolchildren walked out of class under their teachers' noses, roaring and chanting, sitting in the streets. The young are back in politics with a vengeance, high on that heady mix of joy at their own rebellion and horror at the war. Saturday's demonstration in London surprised even the organizers: More than 200,000 people marched to Hyde Park with whistles, horns and drums, making a most un-British racket. Girls in hijab walked with girls in crop tops, peace slogans lipsticked on their faces. Flags pledged allegiance to a world with a different tilt: the Tricolor, the flag of Palestine, the UN banner, Italy's rainbow peace flag (these days, even movements must have merchandise). …

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