Mexico

By Ramirez, Tania Molina | The Nation, April 14, 2003 | Go to article overview

Mexico


Ramirez, Tania Molina, The Nation


Mexico City

"We have come to give flowers instead of missiles," a flower producer repeated, as he gave roses to the passers-by in the main square of Mexico City on Friday morning, hours after the US attacked Iraq. Seven hundred flower producers from several states had gathered that day with a double purpose: to protest the war and to continue with the campaign for a renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which has adversely affected local producers.

This was just one of dozens of demonstrations, plays and performances that have taken place in all corners of Mexico since the start of the war. National issues--like widespread illegal electoral campaign funding and the proposal to militarize Ciudad Juarez following the murders of more than 300 women in that northern city since 1995--were set aside as TV sets throughout the country showed repeated images of bombs falling. Crossings along the 3,000-kilometer US-Mexico frontier, the busiest border in the world, were down to 10-15 percent of the normal rate. Also, the northern and southern borders and oil facilities are now heavily guarded by 20,000 Mexican soldiers, and five missile launchers have recently been installed at oil platform zones.

This country is binational--more than 20 million residents of Mexican origin live in the United States, and they send $10 billion a year to Mexico, so war against Iraq is an issue that directly affects Mexicans, especially in the form of relatives sent to war.

A national survey revealed that 80 percent of Mexicans were against the war on March 21, up from 68 percent a month before. "If Bush loves humanity so much, he should begin by bombarding himself," a schoolteacher living in a small village in the southern Oaxaca mountains said to me a couple of days before the United States went to war. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mexico
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.