An Analysis of the Relationships between Selected Teacher Behaviors and Affective Outcomes of Students in Middle School Physical Education. (Pedagogy)

By Bertelsen, Susan L. | Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, March 2003 | Go to article overview

An Analysis of the Relationships between Selected Teacher Behaviors and Affective Outcomes of Students in Middle School Physical Education. (Pedagogy)


Bertelsen, Susan L., Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport


The primary purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between selected teacher behaviors and interactions provided to girls and boys in middle school physical education classes and the students' affective outcomes. A second purpose was to compare the differences in teacher behaviors provided to students and the affective outcomes of girls and boys by gender of the teacher. A final purpose was to compare the differences between girls and boys affective outcomes. The participants in this study were 14 female and 14 male volunteer physical education teachers from 12 different public middle schools in Northern Colorado. The teachers taught individual, team, and nontraditional activities in a coeducational setting. There were 604 student participants, 281 were girls and 323 were boys. The design of the study included observations of teacher and student interactions during class and students' responses to questionnaires. Questionnaire were used to measure students' affective outcomes of attraction to physical activity, attitude towards physical education, self-esteem, physical activity enjoyment, and physical self-efficacy. Nine teacher behaviors were coded live during two observations of each teacher during class. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine relationships between teacher variables and student variables. …

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