Suicide Bombings Not Only Accepted, but Are Rewarded

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Suicide Bombings Not Only Accepted, but Are Rewarded


Byline: Chaya Gil

It should come as no surprise that suicide bombing, the gruesome hallmark of Palestinian terrorism is being embraced by Iraq against American and British soldiers.

Suicide missions are glorified not only in Palestinian society, but also in the larger Arab world. From the uneducated to the worldly, from secular intelligentsia to devout religious clerics, Palestinian suicide bombing is not only accepted, but applauded and rewarded. Saddam Hussein himself has long been a major underwriter with thousands of dollars paid to the families of suicide bombers in Israel.

In a gruesome reminder of the moral perversity that has become the norm in Palestinian society, Palestinians immediately named the main square in Jenin after the Iraqi suicide attacker who killed four American marines. Islamic Jihad and Yasser Arafat's Fatah movement both claim to be sending suicide bombers to help Hussein.

In a New York Times column last year that eerily forecast current realities in Iraq, Thomas Friedman wrote, "Let's be very clear: Palestinians have adopted suicide bombing as a strategic choice, not out of desperation. This threatens all civilization because if suicide bombing is allowed to work in Israel, then, like hijacking and airplane bombing, it will be copied and will eventually lead to a bomber strapped with a nuclear device threatening entire nations. That is why the whole world must see this Palestinian suicide strategy defeated."

There is no shortage of conflict and atrocity in this world, yet few aggrieved parties have used attacks against civilians as a military and political strategy. How does that strategic decision, sending explosive-laden young men and women to kill the innocent, develop, let alone be deemed honorable by religious and political leaders?

One answer is found at a Web site called Islam Online (www. …

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