Offering a Woman Sterilization during an Emergency Cesarean Section May Sometimes Be Appropriate. (Digests)

By Remez, L. | International Family Planning Perspectives, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Offering a Woman Sterilization during an Emergency Cesarean Section May Sometimes Be Appropriate. (Digests)


Remez, L., International Family Planning Perspectives


High-parity Zimbabwean women who accepted surgical contraception during an emergency cesarean section were no more likely to regret having done so than similar women who underwent the procedure during an elective cesarean (2.5% vs. 3.20/0). According to data collected from the women an average of 32 months after they gave birth, (1) emergency cesarean patients who had not been offered a tubal ligation were six times as likely to be unhappy about their fecundity status as those who had been offered the procedure. In resource-poor settings, the researcher suggests, it may be unethical not to offer emergency cesarean patients of high parity a tubal ligation.

To examine the long-term reproductive satisfaction of high-parity women in a variety of birth circumstances, the researcher gathered retrospective data on the incidence of regret--both of having had a tubal ligation and of not having had one--among those who needed an emergency cesarean, those who had a planned cesarean and those who delivered vaginally. The researchers surveyed women who delivered at a tertiary hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, from December 1990 to July 2000; to be eligible for the study, women had to be giving birth to their fourth or higher-order child (or third or higher for women aged 30 or older).

The data, which were collected by mail or by in-person visits, if needed, were available for three groups of new mothers--418 women who had had an emergency cesarean section, 366 who had had an elective cesarean and 749 who had delivered vaginally. These sample sizes reflect varying attempts to contact sterilized and nonsterilized women for follow-up. (For example, 80% of sterilized women were successfully followed up, compared with 38% of nonsterilized women. Although the researchers tried to contact all nonsterilized cesarean patients of high parity, they attempted to reach a random sample of 20% of the far higher number of women who had delivered vaginally.) The mean length of time between the index delivery and completion of the study questionnaire was 32 months.

The women in the three delivery groups were further classified by sterilization status. Women in all six of the resulting groups were in their mid-30s (mean ages of 32-37). At follow-up, women who had delivered vaginally and elected a postpartum sterilization had the most children (a mean of 6.0), whereas planned cesarean patients who chose sterilization had the fewest (a mean of 4.0). Moreover, the proportion of women whose last pregnancy had been unwanted ranged from 64% among sterilized women who had delivered vaginally to 9% among planned cesarean patients who had either declined or had not been offered a tubal ligation.

Among the 301 emergency cesarean patients who had been offered the option of a postpartum tubal ligation, 11% were unhappy with their situation at follow-up--8% regretted having declined it, 2% regretted their decision to accept it and 1% were unhappy because the clinician had forgotten to perform the requested ligation. On the other hand, 64% of the 117 emergency cesarean patients who had not been given the option of sterilization regretted not having had one. Thus, women who had not been offered sterilization were six times as likely to be dissatisfied as those who had.

Among the 346 patients with planned cesareans whose doctor had offered them a tubal ligation during the cesarean section, 4% were unhappy with their decision (3% regretted having accepted the procedure and 1% regretted having declined it), whereas 65% of the 20 women who had not been offered a tubal ligation regretted not having had one. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Offering a Woman Sterilization during an Emergency Cesarean Section May Sometimes Be Appropriate. (Digests)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.