Security in the Era of Globalization: 2007 G8 Summit Statement on Counter Terrorism

Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, October 15, 2007 | Go to article overview

Security in the Era of Globalization: 2007 G8 Summit Statement on Counter Terrorism


WORLD LEADERS AT THE 2007 G8 SUMMIT IN HEILIGENDAMM AGREED ON COMMON PRINCIPLES FOR COMBATING TERRORISM.

We, the leaders of the G8, are united in condemning in the strongest terms all acts of terrorism and reaffirm that there can be no justification for such acts which constitute one of the most serious threats to international peace and security, and to life and the enjoyment of human rights . We remain resolute in our shared commitment to counter terrorism while promoting freedom, democracy, human rights, and economic growth and opportunity. Our sympathies belong to all victims of terrorist acts, wherever they occur and by whomever they are committed.

Mindful of both the benefits and the challenges that globalization brings to our economies, and recognizing the growing interdependence and interconnectedness of our global economy, we resolve to enhance our cooperation and coordination in order to counter the threats to our way of life posed by terrorism and violent extremism. Together we will make use of all available national and international measures to protect our nations against these threats. We will give particular attention to enhancing the exchange of information and judicial co-operation regarding persons who plot, commit or try to commit terrorist acts against our citizens and values, as well as those who facilitate or incite to commit such acts.

Therefore, today, in Heiligendamm, we pledge to do everything in our power to counter the conditions that terrorists exploit, to keep the world's most dangerous weapons out of the hands of terrorists, to protect critical transport and energy infrastructures, to combat the financing of terrorism and illicit procurement networks and to remain watchful of the ways that terrorists and criminals exploit modern communication and information technologies.

1. Central Role of the United Nations in the Global Fight against Terrorism

We reaffirm our support for the central role of the United Nations in the international fight against terrorism. We recognize that the UN is the sole organization with the stature and reach to achieve universal agreement on the condemnation of terrorism and to effectively address key aspects of the terrorist threat in a comprehensive manner. We therefore warmly welcome the adoption by consensus of the United Nations Global Counter Terrorism Strategy by the General Assembly in September 2006. In this context, we note with satisfaction that the Strategy places adequate emphasis on the necessity of full implementation by all UN member states of all UN Security Council Resolutions relevant for the fight against international terrorism. Thus, the resolutions adopted by and the institutional structures set up by the Security Council, on the one hand, and the General Assembly s Strategy, on the other hand, are mutually reinforcing.

We underscore our strong commitment to and our urgent call for swift conclusion of the draft UN Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism which, above all, aims at facilitating legal cooperation in the fight against terrorism on a global level. We resolve to continue to support and strengthen the United Nations' counter-terrorism efforts. As agreed in St. Petersburg, we provide a report on our efforts in this regard.

2. Reacting to Terrorist and Criminal Abuse of Modern Communication and Information Technology

We note with grave concern the exploitation of modern communication and information technology for the planning and execution of terrorist acts, for the radicalization and recruitment to terrorism and for terrorist training. Its multimedia capabilities and mass-dissemination facilitate the coordination and communication of terrorist groups; the dissemination of terrorist propaganda; and efforts to radicalize and recruit for terrorist activities certain individuals. We resolve to address this abuse of modern communication and information technologies vigorously, while respecting scrupulously the fundamental freedom of expression. …

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