Mothers Are the Perfect Role Models for Business

By Markowitz, Jack | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

Mothers Are the Perfect Role Models for Business


Markowitz, Jack, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Ten economic aspects of Mother's Day, sentimental observations strictly excluded:

Mothers are the original "multitaskers." It's a personnel department word for being qualified to do more than one job, depending on the situation. And do it fairly well. Combine work as cook, nurse, waitress, psychological counselor, seamstress, cleaning lady, bookkeeper, home repairperson, and on and on, and few vocations in the world can compare in complexity and versatility with motherhood. Only half the human race is qualified. Unpaid work, yes, but who could pay enough?

A curious aspect of the "good ol' days" is that women schoolteachers were expected, even required, to quit when they married. School boards could not tolerate the idea of a woman standing before a class pregnant. For this absurdity, America lost some of its best-qualified potential mothers.

On the other hand, modern "maternity dresses" -- is the term even used anymore? -- are not as becoming as the sacklike garments of old. On the other hand, lots of modern clothes aren't. We live in sloppy times, misleadingly called "casual."

Mothers are the natural CFOs, chief financial officers, of the modern household despite inadequate training and the prejudice that it's "a man's job." This means more than holding spending and debt management in line with income. Savings and investment have to be set aside beforespending. So add a rudimentary knowledge of what a stock is, what a mutual fund is, what an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) is to the mother's multitasking. …

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