Gridlock! Glorious Gridlock!

By Steigerwald, Bill | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 7, 2007 | Go to article overview

Gridlock! Glorious Gridlock!


Steigerwald, Bill, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The ghost of James Madison is smiling -- a little.

America has a gloriously divided government again. After six embarrassing years of Republican monopoly misrule inside the Beltway, federal gridlock has returned -- at least on paper.

No more is Congress run by a bunch of power-spoiled, Democrat- impersonating Republicans who rubber-stamp or ignore the Bush administration's mistakes and fiascoes.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her fellow Dems are now in charge. Yes, it's scary and annoying. But for the next two years, if we're lucky and everything works according to the Framers' fine constitutional design, the gears of Big Government should be blessedly jammed.

In this better future world, Democrats running Congress will check-and-balance the Bush administration's executive power surges. President Bush will find his veto pen. And the Republican minority, which has largely forsaken whatever conservative-libertarian values it had, will regain its collective spine and check-and-balance the Democrats.

If bloody, partisan gridlock reigns, we'll get another major bonus -- no more Bush administration "victories."

No more No Child Left Behinds. No more vile Patriot Acts. No more bloated Departments of Porkland Security. No more foolish invasions and occupations of Middle East sand traps.

Gridlocked government is good for America, especially when both parties have fallen in love with big-and-bossy nanny government. If President Bush has his way, however, gridlock may not be able to work its magic.

Last week, Mr. Bush penned an ominous opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal calling for bipartisanship and compromise with the new Democrat Congress. It's phony political maneuvering, to be sure, but the president hopes he and the Dems can work together to "help make America a more secure, prosperous and hopeful society. …

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