Rendell Agrees to Ethics Probe of Grants

By Bumsted, Brad | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Rendell Agrees to Ethics Probe of Grants


Bumsted, Brad, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Senate Republican leaders Wednesday pushed Gov. Ed Rendell into seeking an Ethics Commission opinion on $4.4 million in state grants awarded to groups employing the spouses of two Cabinet members.

The Senate insisted on the opinion before it votes on confirming Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Kathleen McGinty and Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Michael DiBerardinis to second terms.

"We owe it to the public to ensure that these grants were ethical -- proper," Senate Majority Whip Jane Orie, R-McCandless, said.

The spouses of McGinty and DiBerardinis worked for groups that received grants from the two state agencies.

Late yesterday, after earlier balking at the Senate's request, Rendell reversed course and agreed to seek an Ethics Commission opinion. Rendell "is absolutely 100 percent assured there is no ethical lapse here," said his spokesman, Chuck Ardo.

McGinty, a former top official in the Clinton administration, is "one of the stars on Rendell's staff" -- the driving force behind Rendell's alternative energy programs, said Christopher Borick, a political science professor at Muhlenberg College in Allentown.

Orie said the Senate was prepared to vote down the reappointments in the absence of an ethics ruling. Senate leaders wrote to Rendell yesterday -- the last day for the Senate to act on the nominations - - asking him to "recall" the nominations and immediately resubmit them as new nominations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rendell Agrees to Ethics Probe of Grants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.