Political Termites, Illegal Aliens & Roast Chickens

By McNickle, Colin | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 6, 2007 | Go to article overview

Political Termites, Illegal Aliens & Roast Chickens


McNickle, Colin, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


'Tis the season of political termites.

You know them quite well. They are candidates, committee members and campaign workers alike.

Every election cycle they come out of the woodwork, crawling and flying around with telephone calls and messages, perhaps even with a knock on the door, with cheery, clever lines such as "Long time, no talk."

The salutation typically is followed by a nervous laugh or giggle. For they know they have not talked with you -- or even attempted to contact you -- since the last election two or four or six years ago.

Of course, they don't want your views. And never to dwell on their failings, the laughs and giggles segue seamlessly into the real reason for the call or visit -- money.

"I wanted to see if I can pick up a check for (your local or state or federal party committee here) to pay for yard signs" or some such thing.

And it's always followed with a hedged "today ..." that trails off clumsily in reaction to your silence.

Invariably, of course, these are the people who were responsible for, or at least aided and abetted, some molestation of your wallet - - raising taxes, hush-hush talks to raise salaries, voting for some new incarnation of corporate wealthfare or working diligently to hide some secret buyout of some "public servant," then hiding behind some confidentiality agreement.

Thus, elections are a grand time to let the thespians shine within us all: Role-play. Become an exterminator. Jab that touch screen at the polling place with gusto. Make believe it's a powerful insecticide. And unleash that most lethal bolus of disinfecting liberty known to humankind -- your vote.

Eliminate these termites. Only you can prevent an infestation.

The calls for compassion that the usual suspects, secular and religious, tried to drum up surrounding the May Day "immigration" marches around the country were in no way touching. In fact, they show how despicably inured to irresponsible behavior our American society has become.

The most reproachable came in two models. First, there were those who touted "immigration reform" while nod-nod, wink-winking away the real issue -- the invasion of illegal aliens. Then there were those who lamented raids and deportations that split families, sometimes - - Mercy! -- leaving young children without parents.

Just to set the record straight, illegal aliens are not immigrants -- they're lawbreakers.

And who again is it who chose to enter this country illegally and place their families, current or prospective, at risk of arrest, deportation, destitution and abandonment? It certainly wasn't the U.S. government (or CNN's Lou Dobbs, for that matter). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Political Termites, Illegal Aliens & Roast Chickens
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.