The Library, on the South Side, Catalogs a Literary Menu of Electic Cuisine

By Carter, Alice T. | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 21, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Library, on the South Side, Catalogs a Literary Menu of Electic Cuisine


Carter, Alice T., Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Serious diners develop an early wariness of restaurants with kitschy concepts.

Too often more attention is devoted to setting the scene and naming the entrees than in planning, preparing and serving the food.

We'll make an exception for The Library.

Open since March in the East Carson Street restaurant space previously known as The Bridge, The Library offers some seriously good food in a setting with a sense of humor.

Pages recycled from books are laminated onto tabletops. Diners can contemplate exercises from a typing manual or past Steeler glories while munching on executive chef Steven Harlow's menu of eclectic American dishes.

Waitstaff wear jokey T-shirts bearing slogans such as "Check out the librarian!"

Better yet, consult them. On our visits, we've found them to be opinionated, as well as knowledgeable and eager to share their preferences.

The Library it may be, but a reading room it isn't.

The brick walls, wooden floors and laminated tables make the room reverberate with voices even when there's only a few customers. There are also distractions to be had in the first-floor dining room from the multiple televisions there and in the adjacent bar.

The second-floor dining room and its outside patio provide a more contemplative setting.

Wherever you sit, the menus are found between the pages of recycled books such as biology textbooks or vintage cookbooks.

If you're looking for the dessert menu, it's tucked inside the pocket that might once have held the library's checkout card.

Menu selections are labelled with literary references.

Some are accessible and straightforward: The Secret Garden ($7) turns out to be not a tangle of weeds, but an imaginative salad of arugula, cherry tomatoes, tiny fresh strawberries and slices of mild chevre rolled in bits of pecan. A Light in the Attic ($7) offered baby spinach, crumbled Gorgonzola, meaty bits of real bacon and pleasantly tart yellow tomatoes. Both salads were huge and lightly dressed in a balsamic vinaigrette.

Others are more obscure and require a trip to the reference room: Tyler Durden ($19), identified after research as a character from "Fight Club," was a well-prepared, juicy rib-eye steak topped with a sprinkling of Gorgonzola and served over a flavorful pile of rosemary-accented smashed potatoes plus a side of broccoli.

There's no dishonor about The Scarlet Letter ($15), a hearty plate of Asiago-filled tortellini pasta, chunks of fresh mushroom and shreds of spinach covered in a creamy roasted red-pepper sauce.

And the Yellow Brick Road ($17) is one we travelled willingly. More than a dozen mussels basking in a smoky chipolte sauce laden with chunks of chorizo and bits of tomato and brightened but not flavored with saffron pointed more to the Southwest than to Oz. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Library, on the South Side, Catalogs a Literary Menu of Electic Cuisine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.