Performing Arts School Explored in Greensburg

By Stiles, Bob | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 18, 2007 | Go to article overview

Performing Arts School Explored in Greensburg


Stiles, Bob, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The Westmoreland Cultural Trust and other groups are exploring the idea of setting up a high school for the performing arts at The Palace Theatre in Greensburg.

A study is expected to be done later this year to see if there is interest among high school officials and students in Westmoreland County, said Mike Langer, Trust president.

An accompanying analysis will look at costs to convert parts of the historic theater in the city's downtown for use as the school, he said.

Langer explained that high school students often don't have enough time in the school day for everything they want to do.

"They have to make a choice between their love of the performing arts and any other extra-curricular activities," he said.

The students often select other activities over the performing arts, Langer and others said.

The school would operate for half a day. The students would spend the remainder of that day at their home school district, taking core courses such as English, organizers said.

Between 200 and 250 juniors and seniors would be eligible to attend, with entry requirements and a selection process to be decided.

"This would be offered to every school district in Westmoreland County," Langer said.

The school would explore theater both on the stage and behind the scenes, such as set design, lighting and sound.

Langer said the feasibility studies should begin in late summer and be finished by the end of the year. The Trust and other groups involved in the process -- Stage Right, the Westmoreland County commissioners and Seton Hill University -- then will make a decision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Performing Arts School Explored in Greensburg
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.