Battle Plan against War-Related Brain Injuries Sought

By David M. Brown; Allison M. Heinrichs | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

Battle Plan against War-Related Brain Injuries Sought


David M. Brown; Allison M. Heinrichs, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Politicians and doctors in Western Pennsylvania are teaming up to tackle the "signature injury" of the Iraq war.

Traumatic brain injuries can result in lifelong mental problems, speech impairments, memory loss and sometimes death.

"This is probably the most under-sung disease ... of our generation," said Dr. Ross Zafonte, director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's federally funded Traumatic Brain Injury Model System.

At the request of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Zafonte, also executive director of the UPMC Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, testified before Congress last week about brain injuries.

Doctors are increasingly concerned with brain injuries from explosions, such as those from roadside bombs used in Iraq. Even if no shrapnel from the blast touches a person's head, shock waves moving through the air can severely injure the brain.

Because of improved armor, soldiers are surviving explosions that otherwise would cause serious injuries to their lungs, hearts and other vital organs. In past wars, such injuries probably masked the brain injuries.

Among veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan treated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, about 65 percent have traumatic brain injuries, said U.S. Rep. Jason Altmire, D-McCandless. He introduced legislation to address traumatic brain injuries in soldiers. It is a field in which UPMC has built expertise for more than a decade. Altmire was a UPMC lobbyist before he was elected.

Between January 2003 and May, 2,414 veterans of service in Iraq and Afghanistan were treated for traumatic brain injuries at the federally funded Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center's nine medical centers, a spokesman said. In all, more than 26,800 U.S. troops have been wounded in Iraq and 1,400 in Afghanistan, according to the Department of Defense.

Nearly 2 million Americans suffer a form of traumatic brain injury every year, and about 50,000 die, Zafonte told Congress.

Altmire introduced a bill in April -- the Veterans Traumatic Brain Injury Act -- that was incorporated into an expanded measure the House passed in May. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Battle Plan against War-Related Brain Injuries Sought
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.