Doobie Brothers Learn from the Past

By Sculley, Alan | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Doobie Brothers Learn from the Past


Sculley, Alan, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


It's been nearly 30 years since the Doobie Brothers reached a commercial peak. And it's now been 20 years since the group -- with essentially its core original lineup -- regrouped in 1987 to begin what has been an uninterrupted run of touring and recording.

For much of the time during this second coming of the Doobie Brothers, performing Sunday at Seven Springs Mountain Resort, the band has flown somewhat under the radar.

While some might speculate that the Doobie Brothers miss the days when the band's songs were ruling the charts and the group was filling arenas, guitarist-singer Pat Simmons says that's not really part of the plan these days.

"For us, it's not so much about making a big splash as much as coming up with something that we can be proud of and continues the kind of legacy that we've set for ourselves," he says. "I feel like we've put out some good, quality stuff in the past, and we've been proud of where we've been so far. So we want to make sure that it continues along those lines."

In fact, Simmons says with a laugh, the current lineup -- which also includes guitarist-singer Tom Johnston, drummer Michael Hossack, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist John McFee, bassist Skylark, keyboardist-singer Guy Allison, sax player Marc Russo and drummer Ed Toth -- has been intact longer than any previous Doobie Brothers unit. That, in itself, says something about how satisfied the band members are with their musical lives these days.

This kind of stability, of course, is a new twist for the Doobie Brothers. During the band's first run from 1969-1982, the only constant -- besides success -- was change.

The early 1970s lineup of Simmons, Johnston, Hossack, drummer John Hartman and bassist Tiran Porter, specialized in bluesy, hard- rocking music.

By 1975, the group also had added a notable guitarist, Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, while Hossack had been replaced by Keith Knudsen.

With Baxter in the fold, the group's sound grew more diverse and experimental, with country and R&B among the styles surfacing in the songs.

But it was the arrival of singer-keyboardist Michael McDonald following the 1975 album, "Stampede," that really transformed the band's sound -- especially after Johnston left the band in 1977 to pursue a solo career. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Doobie Brothers Learn from the Past
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.